ARCHIVE: LOOKING AT CARS 34 – MOMENTS OF UNEASE

 

 

.

Driving eastwards on Hearty Moor on the Somerset Levels, driving towards the rising sun.  A farmer in a huge 4×4 stopped, looked down at my little car and me, and announced that his cows were on their way down the road towards me, but “just pull over to the side and you’ll be fine!”.

Well, a narrow – in fact single track – road, there was nowhere else to go.  And so to really large, living things moving slowly down the road past me, to huge faces brushing up against the car windows and, catching sight of me within, shying away in panic; and in one unnerving instance, one of their significant bulks trying to squeeze through the little gap between the car and the hedge …

Well, you say, they were only cows, but I have two takes on this.

First, and on the positive side, I used to take paying guests on safari in Kenya, and often used to stop my vehicle in front of an advancing column of elephants, telling everyone to be very quiet and to keep still, and to let the elephants bear down upon us and flow around the vehicle like water around an island in a stream – once, one took even some greenery that had become entangled in our front bumper and ate it.   These were truly wonderful experiences, the great beasts moving slowly past us, the noises, the smells – it was said that an elephant can smell each individual occupant of a vehicle and remember the smell too!  BUT I was younger and less sensible then >>> although my hand was always on the vehicle’s ignition key, and I was in a larger, safari vehicle rather than my little car!  And having been studied for many years, the elephants of Amboseli Game Reserve were very used to people.  Although, even then, getting too near a big bull was really not a good idea.

But second, on the negative side – and much nearer home too – a cow broke out of its field near Bristol a few years back, panicked and ran off down the road.  And when confronted by a small car like mine, it ran up over the bonnet and roof in its panic, killing the driver.  And so to moments of unease on Hearty Moor, though still managing to fire off a few frames.

The Looking at Cars series: looking back through the nine years of the FATman Photos archives (and some new images too), I’m posting pictures of cars in various contexts and styles.  Earlier Looking at Cars posts are here: 1 (with context); 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 .  Each post will open in a separate window.

Click onto the image to open a larger version in a separate window, and click onto that image to further enlarge it – recommended.

Technique: X-T2 with 10-25 Fujinon lens at 36mm (equiv); 800 ISO; Lightroom, starting at the Camera Provia/Standard profile; Hearty Moor, east of Glastonbury on the Somerset Levels; 24 May 2019.

.

.

.

OUTER SUBURBS 297 – DAYSTART, AND JACKDAWS

 

 


.
Walking the Outer Suburbs, just as Our Star starts to rise.  Windows reflect the light, bands of colour fill the sky – and the Jackdaws? >>> they’re on the chimney top at far right.  They’re crows, the smallest of our crows, and they love chimneys;  they are starting to move as the light brightens, bustling on the chimney tops and filling the air with their  sharp calls – “tjack-daw!

Click onto the “early morning” tag (below) to see more images from the early hours of the day. 

Click onto the image to open a larger version in a separate window – certainly recommended.

Technique: TG-5 at 49mm (equiv); 1600 ISO; spot metering; Lightroom, starting at the Camera Portrait profile; south Bristol; 1 Dec 2020.
.
.
.

ARCHIVE: LOOKING AT CARS 31 – STELLA AND EUGENE SET THEIR HEARTS ON THE NICE NEW CAR OUTSIDE THE SHOP WINDOW (MONO)

 

 


.

I’m trying to do different things with these Looking at Cars posts and, well, here is something different – seen while looking across Park Street, in central Bristol, on 24 Apr 2013.

A reversal of reality: the inhabitants of shop windows are now real people, looking into the shop window displays of our world and playing out their materialistic tendencies.  When reality reverses, the dummies go shopping, right?  I can only hope that, when they display me on their mantelpiece, it will be with due sensitivity and prominence, and showing my best profile too …

When I’m processing images and start to see something going right, something promising emerging in front of me, I often start to hum, whistle and even sing (try not to imagine the last of these, especially if you’re under age or have just eaten).  The volume of my ravings can increase as what I’m working on really comes together, and my wife has mentioned strange noises emanating from the FATman Photos Launch Pad … and you thought you were weird … well that makes two of us then …

Anyway, when working on this, I found myself continually humming and singing snatches from Paul Simon’s “Rene and Georgette Magritte with their dog after the war”, and maybe that’s who I see these two as being.  I’ve called them Stella and Eugene because that occurred to me earlier, and I can really see him as a Eugene, but perhaps they’re really Rene and Georgette.

The tone and contrast have been added to create more of an unreal atmosphere.  I had thought about removing the small bright area near the top left corner but, because I wanted the whole diameter of the big car’s wheel, and room to spare each side, this small, pale rectangle helps balance the composition.

The Looking at Cars series: looking back through the nine years of the FATman Photos archives (and some new images too), I’m posting pictures of cars in various contexts and styles.  Earlier Looking at Cars posts are here: 1 (with context); 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 .  Each post will open in a separate window.

Click onto the image to open a larger version in a separate window.

Technique: Canon G11 PowerShot at 140mm (35mm equiv); 400 ISO; converted to mono and toned in Silver Efex Pro 2, starting at the High Contrast Harsh preset.

.
.
.

HOME 3 – THE BATHROOM WINDOW

 

 


.
Looking at the inside of the bathroom window.  The handle of the window’s latch is in shadow, and is seen only as a thin pale line.  To either side, the warm light of the rising sun reflects from the wall of the house next door and lights up the bathroom window’s frosted glass.

The window frame and handle are white, but the early light has given them a blue tinge, which I’ve left uncorrected: I like this addition to the picture’s colours.

And, in these pandemic days, this is the first X-T2 image for many months, which has to be a step forward.

Click onto the “early morning” tag (below) to see more images from the early hours of the day. 

Click onto the image to open a larger version in a separate window.

Technique: X-T2 with 55-200 Fujinon lens at 223mm (equiv); 800 ISO; Lightroom, starting at the Camera Velvia/Vivid profile; Bristol; 26 Nov 2020.
.
.
.

ARCHIVE: LOOKING AT CARS 19

 

 


.
Scene from a suburban driveway: status symbol with sunrise and heavy dew.

The Looking at Cars series: looking back through the nine years of the FATman Photos archives (and some new images too), I’m posting pictures of cars in various contexts and styles.  Earlier Looking at Cars posts are here: 1 (with context); 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 .

Click onto the “early morning” tag (below) to see more images from the early hours of the day.  

Click onto the image to open a larger version in a separate window.

Technique: TG-5 at 100mm (equiv); 800 ISO; spot metering; Lightroom, starting at the Camera Portrait profile; south Bristol; 5 Sept 2020.
.
.
.

OUTER SUBURBS 282 – WET MORNING AT THE SUPERMARKET

 

 


.
Sitting in my car, in a supermarket car park on a wet morning >>>  FATman Photos takes you to some exotic places, there’s no denying that …   Anyway, here’s the view through my car’s wet window.

There are the supermarket’s white emergency exit doors, and a bollard to prevent the over-enthusiastic driving straight in through those doors; then there’s a yellow container full of salted grit in case of ice; and, on the right, one of the columns – looking somewhat the worse for wear, it has to be said – that supports the structure of the building.

Click onto the image to open a larger version in a separate window.

Technique: TG-5 at 100mm (equiv); 1600 ISO; Lightroom, starting at the Modern 01 profile; south Bristol; 2 Oct 2020.
.
.
.

ARCHIVE: LOOKING AT CARS 16

 

 

.

The Looking at Cars series: looking back through the nine years of the FATman Photos archives (and some new images too), I’m posting pictures of cars in various contexts and styles.  Earlier Looking at Cars posts are here: 1 (with context); 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15

Click onto the image to open a larger version in a separate window.

Technique: TG-5 at 70mm; 800 ISO; spot metering; Lightroom, starting at the Modern 01 profile; south Bristol; 26 July 2020.

.

.

.

ARCHIVE: LOOKING AT CARS 11 – EARLY LIGHT, AND DEW

 

 


.

I walk back home most early mornings along a road lined with big cars and big, comfortable, middle class dwellings.  These houses are on my right, to the east of me, with – on clear days –  the autumn sun rising behind them.

There are big areas of shadow where the houses block the sun’s light, but the driveways between these semi-detached houses are ablaze with the early light, with most of the cars pointing directly into it.  There’s a lot of contrast and some blazing reflections, but looking carefully and using the TG-5’s 100mm telephoto and its spot meter, there are areas like this, with the sunlight glancing almost horizontally across the cars’ dew-soaked bodywork and illuminating every surface feature, texture and tiny drop of moisture.  Walking past these cars never fails to draw my gaze.

The Looking at Cars series: looking back through the nine years of the FATman Photos archives (and some new images too), I’m posting pictures of cars in various contexts and styles.  Earlier Looking at Cars posts are here: 1 (with context); 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10

Click onto the “early morning” tag (below) to see more images from the early hours of the day.  

Click onto the image to open a larger version in a separate window – recommended.

Technique: TG-5 at 100mm (equiv); 800 ISO; spot metering; Lightroom, starting at the Modern 03 profile; south Bristol; 14 Sept 2020.
.
.
.

OUTER SUBURBS 280 – BUS SHELTER (MONO)

 

 


.

Click onto the image to open a larger version in a separate window.

Technique: TG-5 at 28mm (equiv); 500 ISO; Lightroom, starting at the B&W 12 profile; south Bristol; 8 Aug 2020.
.
.
.

ARCHIVE 564 – LOOKING INTO A BUILDING AT NIGHT

 

 


.

Offices with the lights on, empty in the early morning; beside Bristol Bridge, central Bristol; 16 Sept 2016.

Click onto the “early morning” tag (below) to see more images from the early hours of the day.

Click onto the image to open a larger version in a separate window – recommended.

Technique: X-T1 with 55-200 Fujinon lens at 305mm (equiv); 3,200 ISO.

.
.
.

%d bloggers like this: