PEOPLE: PICTURE GALLERY 1 – POSTS 1-10

PEOPLE PICTURE GALLERIES

I’m currently posting images from my archive of photos of people.  As always with these archives, I’m trying to use a variety of approaches and responses to the subject.  These photos are being posted singly, with full text.

To make viewing of these images easier for those with little time to spare, I’m also posting groups of these images in galleries with minimal titles.  This is the first gallery.

Clicking onto each image will open a larger version in a separate window: doing this often enhances the image.

1: Woman in a cafe; Camborne, 2013.

2: Girl in a white dress, with side lighting; Bristol, 2012.

3: Guests laughing at a wedding reception; Surrey, 2012.

4: Boat owner; Porthleven, 2016.

5: A friend, aged two; Bristol, 2011.

6: Death of a beautiful person: George Ann Weaver, 1942-2016.

7: Lovers; St Ives, 2012.

8: In the Dida Galgalla Desert, northern Kenya; 1978.

9: Man on stairs; Newquay, 2011.

10: Friends at a wedding; near Bristol, 2011.

ARCHIVE: PEOPLE 17 – PEOPLE AT A WEDDING RECEPTION


Looking at people.  A wedding reception near Bristol; 17 Aug 2011.  Smiles and laughter to either side of someone in a suit draped drunkenly over someone else.

Happy days.  And who says we Brits haven’t got class?! 😎

Click onto the image to open a larger version in a separate window – recommended.

Technique: D700 with 24-120 Nikkor lens at 120mm; 1000 ISO.



ARCHIVE: PEOPLE 16 – AT A PARTY, TALKING TO A WAITRESS (MONO)


Man at a party talking to a waitress, in the William Bray bar and restaurant, Shere, Surrey; 24 Mar 2012.

The background to this shot is a jumbled mass of humanity, so I’ve used SEP2 to darken everything except the two subjects.  The waitress is essential to the composition, because she is the person to whom the man is addressing his remarks.  But her face is turned away, she is only seen in extreme side face, and my gaze is drawn to the illuminated face of the man.

Click onto the image to open a larger version in a separate window.

Technique: D700 with 24-120 Nikkor lens at 120mm; 400 ISO; bounced, diffused flash; converted into mono and further manipulated in Silver Efex Pro 2.



ARCHIVE: PEOPLE 13 – DOMINANT FEMALE (MONO)


Dominant female, amongst guests at a wedding reception; 17 Aug 2011.

Click onto the image to open a larger version in a separate window.

Technique: D700 with 24-120 Nikkor lens at 120mm; 1000 ISO; conversion to mono in Silver Efex Pro.

(2021) UPDATE: I certainly didn’t have this interpretation of the shot in mind when I took it, nor when it was first posted here, 10 years ago now.

The other three people present are dark, placid even – and even I can see that the jeans on the left are not “natty gents’ wedding wear” – tho maybe for “The Younger Generation” this no longer matters, which is an attitude I wholeheartedly applaud.

But the person in the right foreground is bright and smart, probably in all senses of those terms, and elegant even – and that pose is nothing if not assertive.



ARCHIVE: PEOPLE 10 – FRIENDS AT A WEDDING (MONO)


Some good friends invited us to their wedding reception and I took my camera along – and fired off 384 frames!  Now I have the very enjoyable task of sorting through these images, looking for good frames or, more probably, looking for good bits of frames – photos within photos, like the one here.  I’m very keen on cropping photos very tightly, so that anything extraneous to the subject is cut out – I remember this approach being described as taking an optical machete to a photo – and yep, that’s what its like!

An interesting photographic issue arose while I was firing off my 384.  With a film camera, if you load a 36 film you’ll get 36 photos, or perhaps 37 or 38 if you push things a little – and risk pulling the film right out of the cassette.  We do of course also have frame counters on digital cameras, but I remember reading somewhere that we should use them in the same way we use the petrol gauges in our cars.  Which is to say, that if we have a full tank of petrol, we’ll use it up quicker if we only drive around town, continually stopping and starting, rather than taking a nice steady drive on a motorway.  Its the same with digital frame counters.  You may start off with 100 frames, but if you pack your pictures with wall to wall detail you might only actually get 90 frames, whereas if you shoot bland, low detail subjects, you might get 120 or more.

I saw this happen at the wedding reception.  The 8Gb card I keep in my D700 always says that I have 310 shots if I’m shooting Raw, which is the only file format that I ever shoot.  So, wallowing in the 310, I fired away with abandon at the guests and, in the end found my frame counter reading 89, and so concluded that I had taken 310 – 89 photos.  However, when I got the photos onto this PC, I found that I’d taken 384 frames – so presumably my frames averaged out containing less detail than the camera had been expecting.  Many of you may know this already but, if not, something to store away in the backs of our minds maybe.

Click onto this image to open a larger version in a separate window.

Technique: D700 with 24-120 Nikkor lens at 120mm; 1000 ISO; 17 Aug 2011.



ARCHIVE 601 – PHOTOGRAPHER (MONO)

 

 


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Photographer at a wedding reception near Bristol; 17 Aug 2011.  Some good friends invited us to their wedding reception and I took my camera along – and fired off 384 frames (including this one)!

Clash of the Nikons!  Here I’ve used Silver Efex Pro to emphasise the structure (i.e. detail) of the cut and patterning of the clothes, the wristwatch and the camera, which makes everything sharp and crisp, almost standing up out of the picture in 3D.  The subject is anonymous, save for the designer stubble and the strong hands familiarly manhandling the very solid and businesslike D2x.

There are two strong lines at varying angles in the picture.  One heads up towards 11am, from the wristwatch and through the camera to the top of the flashgun.  The other heads up towards 1pm, following the white shirt up between “the gateposts of the two cuffs” to the camera and the man’s chin.  The presence of these two axes brings some sense of movement and action to the shot – this is not someone posing with his camera, but rather someone actively in the process of taking photographs.

Click onto the image to open a larger version in a separate window.

Technique:  D700 with 24-120 Nikkor lens at 120mm; 1000 ISO.

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ARCHIVE 550 – SHOP SELLING BRIDAL WEAR

 

 


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Elegant, graceful bling: it comes at a price mind, but then its for the day when no expense is spared and perfection is the sole (no pun intended!), simply must-have outcome.

There is another Queens Road dress here.

Click onto the image to open a larger version in a separate window.

Technique: X-T2 with 55-200 Fujinon lens at 276mm (equiv); 400 ISO; Lightroom, using the Velvia/Vivid film simulation; Queens Road, central Bristol; 7 Apr 2017.

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ARCHIVE 542 – MAN AT A WEDDING (MONO)

 

 


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Man at a wedding reception near Bristol; 17 Aug 2011.

With this striking character, I’ve definitely gone for the tough guy or gangster look.  His tie was a splendid red, but restoring that colour here would have unbalanced and cheapened the whole shot I think – it would have been a major distraction.

Click onto the image to open a larger version in a separate window.

Technique: D700 with 24-140 Nikkor lens at 140mm; 1000 ISO; converted to mono with Silver Efex Pro 2, starting from the Cool Tones 1 preset.

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ARCHIVE KENYA 34 – BOYS AT A WEDDING (MONO)

 

 

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Young boys – curious, uncertain –  at a wedding near Thika, Kenya, in the late 1970s.

I think I was the only non-African at this ceremony, and so an object of great curiosity to all the youngsters there.

Click onto the image to open a larger version in a separate window – recommended.

Technique: OM-2 with 75-150 Zuiko lens; Kodak Ektachrome 200 colour slide (I think!); Silver Efex Pro 2, starting at the Landscape preset.

THE ARCHIVE KENYA SERIES

I’m re-posting photographs that I took in Kenya over 30 years ago.  You can find more context here .  Click onto the “Archive Kenya” tag (below) to see more of these film images from Kenya.

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ARCHIVE KENYA 6 – KIKUYU GIRL WITH FANTA

 

 


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Little Kikuyu girl at a wedding near Thika; late 1970s. The bottle of Fanta fizzy orange is about 10 inches tall – and evidently her treasure!  She’s chewing the white Fanta bottle top while wondering with horror what this fat mazungu (white man) with his camera is about to do to her!

I enjoyed my years in Kenya.  The people were hospitable and friendly, and humorous too.  And the children were an especial delight.  I was often off the beaten track, far from the tourist areas, collecting bird records for the bird atlas I was later to write, and for many of these small children I may have been the first white person they had ever seen – or at least seen closely.  When I neared habitation, they would rush out and swarm around me – “Mazungu, mazungu!” – brimming over with vitality and fun, and vast curiosity too.  I remember them touching my skin, and especially my hairy arms, with great wonder.  Very human moments; certainly moments to treasure, all these years later.

And, as always, “all these later years” brings thoughts.  Let’s say this was 1980 for ease of maths (never my strong point, despite having worked in data management and analysis for 20 years …), so that’s 40 years ago so, if she has survived – always that big if … –  she will now be a woman of 43 or so, with her own children probably.  I wonder if she will still remember that far off wedding day? Probably not but, anyway, here she is.

Click onto the image to open a larger version in a separate window.

Technique: OM-2 with 75-150 Zuiko lens; colour slide film.

THE ARCHIVE KENYA SERIES

I’m re-posting photographs that I took in Kenya over 30 years ago.  You can find more context here .  Click onto the “Archive Kenya” tag (below) to see more of these film images from Kenya.

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