SOMERSET LEVELS PICTURE GALLERY 6 – POSTS 51-60

SOMERSET LEVELS PICTURE GALLERIES

I’m currently posting images from my large archive of photos from the Somerset Levels, an area not far from where I grew up that holds particular meaning and attraction for me.  These photos are being posted singly, with full text.

To make viewing of these images easier for those with little time to spare, I’m also posting groups of these images with minimal titles.  This is the 6th gallery – you can find the earlier galleries here: 1 2 3 4 5

Clicking onto each image will open a larger version in a separate window: doing this often enhances the image.

51: Water Lilies in the North Drain, Tealham Moor; 2009.

52: Sunrise, Totney Drove; 2018.

53: Early morning, Ash Moor; 2019.

54: Looking south, Tadham Moor; 2019.

55: The poplars at Godney; 2018.

56: In the undergrowth, Swanshard Lane; 2019.

57: Teasel along Tripps Drove; 2012.

58: The road south across Tealham Moor; 2014.

59: Trees in mist, Tadham Moor; 2011.

60: Sugar cubes in Baillies’ Cafe, Burnham-On-Sea; 2012.



ARCHIVE: LEVELS 56 – IN THE UNDERGROWTH, SWANSHARD LANE


This image is best seen enlarged – click onto it to open a larger version in a separate window, and click onto that image to enlarge it further – recommended .

Moving through early morning’s wet undergrowth in Swanshard Lane, and chancing upon this: motionless within an object of natural beauty that it has itself created, a predator waits.

Technique: Z 6 with 70-300 Nikkor lens at 300mm; 3200 ISO; Lightroom, starting at the Camera Landscape v2 profile; in the bushes beside Swanshard Lane, on the Somerset Levels southwest of Wells; 23 Aug 2019.

SOMERSET LEVELS: SOME KEYWORDS

And finally – some keywords that will often be mentioned in this archive series:

Droves:  to avoid crossing other peoples’ land when accessing their own, the farmers constructed a series of tracks, known as droves, between the fields. Some of these droves are now metalled roads and many persist as open tracks – all of which allow wonderfully open access to this countryside.

Rhynes: the fields are bounded by water-filled ditches – which both drain the ground and act as stock barriers. Hence strange landscapes – where fields appear quite unbounded, except for a gate with a short length of fencing on either side of it, where a bridge crosses the water-filled boundary ditch to provide access the field.  These small wet ditches communicate with larger rhynes (“reen” as in Doreen), which in turn flow into larger drains, e.g. the North and South Drains in the Brue Valley. All of these waterways are manmade and, by intricate series of pumping stations and flood gates, all of them have their water levels controlled by local farmers, internal drainage boards or the Environment Agency.

Pollarded Willows: the banks of the rhynes were often planted with Willow trees, both to help strengthen the banks and also to show the courses of roads and tracks during floods. These Willows are often pollarded, i.e. their upper branches are cut off, which results in distinctively broad and dense heads to the trees. Pollarding keeps trees to a required height, while ensuring a steady supply of wood – more important in the past than now – for fires, thatching spars, fencing and so on.



ARCHIVE KENYA 28 – IF YOU’RE AN ARACHNOPHOBE, LOOK AWAY NOW!

 

 


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Female spider using two of her eight legs to guard her swarming brood of tiny young; around 1980.

This spider secured herself high up inside my living room window in Nairobi and I left her unmolested, to see what outcome this might bring. After the young appeared, I attached some card up against the outside of the window, to provide a more or less uniform backdrop for this flash photo.

Click onto the image to open a larger version in a separate window – recommended …. and if the nightmares start, well don’t forget you saw them first on FATman Photos!

Technique: OM-2 with through the lens flash metering; Agfa CT18 colour slide film, rated at 64 ISO.

THE ARCHIVE KENYA SERIES

I’m re-posting photographs that I took in Kenya over 30 years ago.  You can find more context here .  Click onto the “Archive Kenya” tag (below) to see more of these film images from Kenya.

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ARCHIVE KENYA 10 – NIGHTMARE IN A BUNCH OF BANANAS

 

 


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Nightmare, found dead in a bunch of bananas bought in a market in Nairobi, Kenya; probably late 1970s.

I don’t know exactly what this creature was, but as I sat at the dining table and took one from a bunch of (Kenyan) bananas in the fruit bowl, its dead countenance looked out at me.  It was something like a spider, as I remember it about the size of the House Spiders found here in the UK.

I have a bit of background in the Life Sciences, and various travels, including seasons of fieldwork in Oman, had introduced me to many wonderful creatures.  So although primarily a birder, by the time I reached Kenya I was interested in anything and everything, although not having any specialist knowledge.  And so, when this appeared on my dining table, the camera, tripod and extension tubes duly came out, and here it is.  Does anyone have any idea what it is???

Click onto the image to open a larger version in a separate window.

Technique: OM-1 with 50mm Zuiko lens; extension tubes; tripod; Agfa CT18 colour slide film, rated at 64 ISO.

THE ARCHIVE KENYA SERIES

I’m re-posting photographs that I took in Kenya over 30 years ago.  You can find more context here .  Click onto the “Archive Kenya” tag (below) to see more of these film images from Kenya.

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SOMERSET LEVELS 421 – IN THE UNDERGROWTH, SWANSHARD LANE

 

 


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This image is best seen enlarged – click onto it to open a larger version in a separate window, and click onto that image to enlarge it further – recommended .

Moving through early morning’s wet undergrowth in Swanshard Lane, and chancing upon this: motionless within an object of natural beauty that it has itself created, a predator waits.

There are other recent spider pictures here: 1 2 .

Technique: Z 6 with 70-300 Nikkor lens at 300mm; 3200 ISO; Lightroom, starting at the Camera Landscape v2 profile; in the bushes beside Swanshard Lane, on the Somerset Levels southwest of Wells; 23 Aug 2019.
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HOME 2 – HOUSE SPIDER

 

 


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Its that time of year again, and big House Spiders have started appearing here and there chez nous; this one was on the wall of our hallway at night.  There no sense of scale here but – particularly with that wonderfully outstretched, hairy leg – this one can’t be far short of 2 inches (5 cm) across.

A great Natural World enthusiast, I’ve had a lot of wonderful encounters with wildlife over the years, particularly – but far from exclusively – during 12 years’ residence in Kenya, where I worked as a safari leader for several years.  I suppose my most memorable encounter was being with Mountain Gorillas on the Virunga volcanoes in Rwanda: we were on foot, they looked at us, we looked at them, and that was an experience both powerful and moving.

But, on a far more local scale, memorable encounters have happened here at home too.  I’ll never forget offering my forefinger to a Red Admiral butterfly, motionless on our back lawn on a chilly autumn morning, and being enthralled as the insect climbed up onto my finger and remained there – perhaps glad of my slight warmth.  And then again, with these big House Spiders, out of devilment I sometimes get down on the floor beside them and give them the gentlest of prods, which instantly sends them off into totally chaotic retreat >>> a valued and enduring memory is actually hearing one’s hurtling footsteps as it rushed across an A4 sheet of paper lying on the floor – magic, simply magic!

There is another recent spider picture here: 1 .

Click onto the image to open a larger version in a separate window, and click onto that image to further enlarge it – recommended.

Technique: TG-5 at 30mm (equiv), used in Microscope mode, which allows focusing down to 1cm; 1600 ISO; Lightroom, starting at the Camera Portrait profile; south Bristol; 21 Sept 2019.

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SOMERSET LEVELS 414 – SPIDER ON A BRIDGE

 

 


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A life spent hanging from the girders of Eastern Moor Bridge, a narrow structure crossing Cripps River on Liberty Moor.

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Click onto each image to open another version in a separate window, and click onto that image to enlarge it further.

Techniques: upper image – Z 6 with 70-300 Nikkor lens; 1000 ISO; Lightroom, starting at the Camera Portrait v2 profile;  lower image – X-T2 with 10-24 Fujinon lens; 200 ISO; Lightroom, starting at the Camera Astia Soft profile; Eastern Moor Bridge on Liberty Moor, on the Somerset Levels east of East Huntspill; 2 Aug 2019.
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SOMERSET LEVELS 398 – EARLY MORNING 7 (MONO)

 

 


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Gate to a field; morning dew.

Other images in this Early Morning series are here: 1 2 3 4 5 6 .

Click onto the image to open a larger version in a separate window, and click onto that image to further enlarge it – recommended.

Technique: Z 6 with 70-300 Nikkor lens at 300mm; 3200 ISO; Lightroom, starting at the Camera Graphite profile; Swanshard Lane, on the Somerset Levels southwest of Wells; 23 Aug 2019.
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SOMERSET LEVELS 340 – MORNING DEW 3

 

 


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This image is best viewed enlarged: click onto it to open a larger version in a separate window, and click onto that image to further enlarge it – recommended.

Another look at the field gate: webs and dew drops, early on a damp, cold morning.

Earlier morning dew images are here: 1 2 .

Technique: Z 6 with 70-300 Nikkor lens at 300mm; 400 ISO; Lightroom, using the Camera Standard V2 picture control; beside Bourtonbridge Drove, on Queen’s Sedge Moor, on the Somerset Levels south of Wells; 26 Apr 2019.

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SOMERSET LEVELS 332 – MORNING DEW (MONO)

 

 


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This image is best seen enlarged: click onto it to open a larger version in a separate window, and click onto that image to enlarge it further – recommended.

Gate to a field, with spider’s web and early morning dew.

Technique: Z 6 with 70-300 Nikkor lens at 300mm; 400 ISO; jpeg produced by in-camera Raw processing in the Z 6, using the camera’s Dramatic picture control; minimal further processing in Lightroom; beside Bourtonbridge Drove, on Queen’s Sedge Moor, on the Somerset Levels south of Wells; 26 Apr 2019.
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