ARCHIVE STILL LIFE PICTURE GALLERY 2 : POSTS 11-20

ARCHIVE STILL LIFE PICTURE GALLERIES

I’m currently posting images from my large archive of (loosely defined!) still life photos.  These photos are being posted singly, with full text.

To make viewing of these images easier for those with little time to spare, I’m also posting groups of these images with minimal titles.  This is the second gallery – you can find the earlier galleries here: 1 .

Clicking onto each image will open a larger version in a separate window: doing this often enhances the image.

Looking down onto the shadow of a footbridge; 2014.

Dustbin and blue cord, in a churchyard; 2014.

The upper deck of a bus, on a sunny day; 2017.

My wife’s glass of wine, in a Bristol pub, on a sweaty afternoon; 2016.

Looking into a building at night; 2016.

Teasels, in the valley of the River Chew; 2013.

Seascape, Lizard Point, Cornwall; 2016.

Public seating; 2016.

Small tree, on the Mendip Hills; 2018.

Advertisement, a little the worse for wear; 2017.

ARCHIVE: STILL LIFE 24 – TWO WOMEN IGNORING A PIGEON (MONO)


Two women in Bristol city centre purposely ignoring a pigeon that, after all, was only trying to be friendly; photographed from the upper deck of a bus, 24 Apr 2013.

And before you ask – this outcome was not in my mind when I took the shot.

Click onto the image to open a larger version in a separate window.

Technique: Canon G11 PowerShot at 140mm (35mm equivalent); 200 ISO; converted to mono in Silver Efex Pro 2, jumping off at the Silhouette EV +0.5 preset.

ARCHIVE STILL LIFE

This is a new category on this blog – Archive Still Life studies.  The Still Life definition will certainly be followed loosely – e.g. some studies may only have been made “still” by the split second opening of the camera’s shutter – and my objective will be to use as many different types / genres of subject matter as possible.  Some images will be Minimalist and, in general, I try to make simpler images, rather than cramming them with visual content.

Some new Still Life studies will (hopefully!) continue to appear.



ARCHIVE: STILL LIFE 13 – THE UPPER DECK OF A BUS, ON A SUNNY DAY


Upstairs on an empty bus, at a stop in central Bristol.

At the top, the picture all is peace, happiness and light – the bus’s seats and windows, illuminated by a bright sunny morning.

But below is darker, and those eyes are looking – rather too intently, I do think – only at you.

Click onto the image to open a larger version in a separate window – recommended.

Technique: X-T1 with 55-200 Fujinon lens at 250mm (equiv); 800 ISO; 20 Jan 2017.

ARCHIVE STILL LIFE

This is a new category on this blog – Archive Still Life studies.  The Still Life definition will certainly be followed loosely – e.g. some studies may only have been made “still” by the split second opening of the camera’s shutter – and my objective will be to use as many different types / genres of subject matter as possible.  Some images will be Minimalist and, in general, I try to make simpler images, rather than cramming them with visual content.

Some new Still Life studies will (hopefully!) continue to appear.



ARCHIVE 574 – BUS SHELTER (MONO)

 

 

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Seats in a bus shelter;  Bristol, 24 Apr 2013.

The narrow and tilted seats, with intervening arm rests, that are designed to make it impossible for homeless people to sleep on them.

Click onto the image to open a larger version in a separate window.

Technique: G11 PowerShot at 140mm (35mm equiv); 200 ISO; converted to mono with Silver Efex Pro 2, using the Silhouette preset.

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OUTER SUBURBS 245 – PARKED CAR 17, EARLY LIGHT ON DRIVING SEAT

 

 


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Early morning, the streets quiet and deserted, and a shaft of reflected sunlight illuminates the driving seat of a decidedly up market auto.

There are earlier images in this Parked Car series here: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 .  Each will open in a separate window.

Click onto the “early morning” tag (below) to see more images from the early hours of the day.

Click onto the image to open a larger version in a separate window.

Technique: TG-5 at 100mm (equiv); 800 ISO; spot metering; Lightroom, starting at the Modern 01 profile; south Bristol; 25 June 2020.
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ARCHIVE 486 – FAST FOOD OUTLET (MONO)

 

 


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Table and seats outside a fast food café in Newquay, Cornwall; 11 Sept 2013.

Technique: D800 with 70-300 Nikkor lens at 135mm; 800 ISO; Silver Efex Pro 2’s High Contrast Smooth preset.

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OUTER SUBURBS 227 – BUS SHELTER, EARLY MORNING LIGHT

 

 

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Walking in the lockdown, walking up a hill towards a bus shelter that was being visually roasted by the sun’s early light.  The was a colourful advertisement on the far wall of the shelter and, as the warm hues of the sunrise played on this poster, reflections flew everywhere and the interior of the shelter was ablaze with bright, warm colours.

Technique: a blogging colleague, Michael Scandling, recently put out a very useful post (here) discussing the quality of digital images.  Many photographers try for images that are as noise-free and sharp as possible, which can result in pictures that, to use his words, are plastic and clinical – and I know exactly what he means.  Some think that all images should be technically perfect, whereas others consider content and narrative more important – and I’m 100% with the contenters and narrators.  In his post, Michael went on to say that, in post processing, he often uses noise reduction sparingly, that he sometimes selectively softens areas of a picture and artificially introduces grain.

And so to trying out some of Michael’s points here – no luminance noise reduction; artificially introduced grain; Lightroom’s Camera Vivid profile; increased Vibrance – and I like the result, and am certainly going to bear these points in mind for future pictures >>> thank you, Michael!

And looking at all these colours brings a story to mind.  Forty or more years ago, in Kenya, I was giving a slideshow (remember slideshows?) to a group of American aid workers who were lolling around smoking pot, and I’ll always remember the almost ecstatic tones of ” … oh wow, man! …… THE  ******* COLOURS, MAN! ……”.   Halcyon days …  and no, before you ask, I didn’t take up the offer of any of their heavenly medicine … already, at that tender age, being a truly confirmed disciple of the … Electric Soup … courtesy, in those days, of the excellent output of Kenya Breweries, which even included a  local version of Guinness!

Click onto the “early morning” tag (below) to see more images from the early hours of the day.

Click onto the image to open a larger version in a separate window – recommended.

Technique: TG-5 at 100mm (equiv); 800 ISO; spot metering; Lightroom, starting at the Camera Vivid profile; south Bristol; 5 Apr 2020.

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ARCHIVE 447 – EMPTY BOTTLE BESIDE PUBLIC SEATING

 

 


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Pavement with bottle and concrete seat; outside the former KPMG building, central Bristol; 9 Dec 2016.

This is early morning, and the golden tinge is produced by the building’s lights.

The original image (rotate this image by 90 degrees anti-clockwise) pictured Reality, and rotation by 90 degrees clockwise has apparently produced Unreality.  The bottle is either defying the force of gravity – >>> or I have cheated and glued it to a wall!

But, were we able to view the scene from this “unreal” angle, perhaps using something like a climbing frame or some other form of support, then this is what we would see – so that, in fact, this is Reality too, but seen from a different perspective.

Click onto the image to open a larger version in a separate window.

Technique: X-T1 with 55-200 Fujinon lens at 186mm (equiv); 6400 ISO; rotated.

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OUTER SUBURBS 203 – BUS SHELTER (MONO)

 

 


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A bleak interior, facing a bleak main road, but still thought worthy of the armrests that bring comfort for the have’s while prohibiting a night’s meagre repose – out of the rain if nothing else – for the have-not’s.

Click onto the image to open a larger version in a separate window.

Technique: TG-5 at 100mm (equiv); 400 ISO; Lightroom, starting at the B&W 03 profile; south Bristol; 21 Jan 2020.
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SOMERSET LEVELS 438 – WALKING WESTON’S STREETS 5

 

 

Looking back at me through autumn leaves – an image confronting an image maker

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Weston-super-Mare, my home town, on the coast where the Somerset Levels run down into the Bristol Channel – the local, somewhat muddy, version of the sea.  Following a recent reunion with age-old friends there (here), I’ve been visiting Weston again, and walking streets echoing with things remembered – sometimes only half-remembered –  from over half a century ago.

Weston is a seaside town and, like seaside towns the UK over, it is experiencing something of an economic downturn – the era of the family seaside holiday in uncertain British weather is long past, due to cheap holidays in warmer and far more reliable, foreign climes.  So, there is to Weston something of the cheap and cheerful, a – to me, anyway – rather attractive tattiness at the edges, that makes walking here with a camera a pleasure – a definite feeling of not knowing what will appear next.  The Ghost of FATman Past perhaps?  Well, if he gives me half a chance, I’ll photograph him …

And so in Nov 2019 to pictures taken with an open mind – pictures which are, for better or for worse, in the main quite different from the preceding 400+ that I’ve posted of the Somerset Levels.  Some of them may be a little obscure / far out / radical / unexplained /  I don’t know… but I did mention photographing with an open mind, which means looking, on the spur of the moment, at anything and everything …    But, whatever, warts and all, I hope you’ll like (at least some of) these images.  (Click onto them to enlarge them)

Earlier posts in this series are here: 1 2 3 4 .

A short history of Weston is here.

View into – and through – a phone kiosk, with the blue doors of public toilets in the background for local colour

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The big, solid, expensive houses of upper class (probably Victorian) Weston, built high up on the southern slopes of Worlebury Hill, looking out over Weston Bay – and solid they are, built of great blocks of the hard, grey Carboniferous Limestone that forms this hill, most probably obtained from the many quarries nearby.  And it was on the top of Worlebury Hill where this geologist – aged about 5 or 6 – found his first fossil, a Carboniferous brachiopod, a type of shellfish, on a limestone fragment in his garden.  Excitingly asking his Mum whether he could bring it into the house, he was told that it was alright as long as it wasn’t alive.  And it was this same Mum who, left penniless after my father disappeared in search of pastures new, scrimped and saved to keep him on at school so that he could eventually fulfil what she knew was his dream, to study geology at university

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Public seating with autumn leaves

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