OUTER SUBURBS 72 – PATH THROUGH MODERN HOUSING 6

 

 


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Another functional and not unattractive pathway through modern housing, and something very different from the previous one.  Unusually for me, colour and mono images here – for me the black and white gets it – and I think its worth enlarging >>> click onto it to open a larger version in a separate window, and click onto that image to enlarge it yet again.

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Earlier pictures of a paths through modern housing are here: 1 2 3 4 5 .  Each will open in a separate window.

The first image in the Outer Suburbs series, with context, is here: 1 .  Subsequent images are here: 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 45 46 47 48 49 50 51 52 53 54 53a 55 56 57 58 59 60 61 62 63 64 65 66 67 68 69 70 71 .  Each will open in a separate window.

Technique: TG-5 at 25mm (equiv); Lightroom, using the Camera Vivid film simulation; Silver Efex Pro 2, starting at the High Contrast Orange preset and adding a light Coffee tone; south Bristol; Jan & Feb 2019.
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OUTER SUBURBS 60 – PATH THROUGH MODERN HOUSING 5 (MONO)

 

 


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To be more inside this image, to better imagine being there, its best to enlarge it.  To do this, click onto it to open a larger version in a separate window, and click onto that image to enlarge it further – recommended.

Walking along a path, walking along a modern suburban canyon, in the early morning.

This is the path also shown, from a slightly different viewpoint, in image 1 on the next line.

Earlier pictures of a paths through modern housing are here: 1 2 3 4 .  Each will open in a separate window.

The first image in the Outer Suburbs series, with context, is here: 1 .  Subsequent images are here: 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 45 46 47 48 49 50 51 52 53 54 53a 55 56 57 58 59 .  Each will open in a separate window.

Technique: TG-5 at 25mm (equiv); 1600 ISO; Lightroom, using the Camera Natural film simulation; Silver Efex Pro 2, starting at the Full Dynamic Harsh preset and adding a light Selenium tone; south Bristol; 13 Dec 2018.
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OUTER SUBURBS 56 – PATH THROUGH MODERN HOUSING 4

 

 

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Path between houses, in the early morning, just after dawn.

Earlier pictures of a paths through modern housing are here: 1 2 3 .  Each will open in a separate window.

The first image in the Outer Suburbs series, with context, is here: 1 .  Subsequent images are here: 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 45 46 47 48 49 50 51 52 53 54 53a 55 .  Each will open in a separate window.

Click onto the image to open a larger version in a separate window, and click onto that image to enlarge it further.

Technique: TG-5 at 43mm (equiv); 2500 ISO; Lightroom, using the Camera Natural film simulation; south Bristol; 12 Dec 2018.

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OUTER SUBURBS 47 – THE PATH TO SCHOOL (MONO)

 

 


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The path to school, one of Life’s Paths, one of the paths that we all tread (assuming we are lucky enough to attend a school, or are not schooled at home).  This particular path is through a rather utilitarian landscape.  Utilitarian? Google tells me it means “practical rather than attractive” which is perhaps a little hard; whereas picturesque might be a little charitable.

So what’s here for the children, on their daily walk towards learning?

Well, the wall on the right protects private properties: if they want to go in there (assuming they don’t live there already), they either have to go in for trespass and burglary (which might lead to far-reaching Life changes) or, later in life, get onto the housing ladder, as the phrase so happily puts it.  Getting onto the housing ladder?  Well, it means scrimping and saving to buy nicer and nicer homes for themselves, and thus getting themselves further and further into debt; prior to (at least partially) bankrolling their children to repeat the process.

Then straight ahead, at the end of the path, is the primary school: a state school, funded by taxes, with the wonderful aims of education, and of preparation of the young people for Life In The Outside World.

And to the left of the path, out of shot, is a church which, if at all possible, would like their souls.  Assuming, that is, that they – or indeed anyone else – in fact has a soul, which has long been a matter for speculation.  However, since the possession of an immortal soul is a cornerstone of this particular religion’s mythology, embarking on such speculation to the left of the path may become a little contentious.

So, looking at the options, I think that if I were the children, I’d stay on the path, I’d keep on walking straight ahead, at least until I’m old enough to make more informed judgements on both the worldly to the right and the divine to the left.

The first image in the Outer Suburbs series, with context, is here: 1 .  Subsequent images are here: 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 45 46 .  Each will open in a separate window.

Click onto the image to open another version in a separate window, and click onto that image to further enlarge it.

Technique:  TG-5 at 25mm (equiv); 640 ISO; Lightroom, using the Camera Vivid film simulation; Silver Efex Pro 2, starting at the Landscape preset; south Bristol; 2 Oct 2018.
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OUTER SUBURBS 31 – PATH THROUGH MODERN HOUSING 3

 

 


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The partly seen car – a truncated splash of bright, reflective, curved colour – drew my eye.  It contrasted with the mass of non-reflective, straight-sided shapes – the blank, utilitarian facades of the built environment – surrounding it.

Earlier pictures of a paths through modern housing are here: 1 2 .  Each will open in a separate window.

The first image in the Outer Suburbs series, with context, is here: 1 .  Subsequent images are here: 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 .  Each will open in a separate window.

Click onto the image to open another version in a separate window, and click onto that image to enlarge it further.

Technique: TG-5 at 57mm (equiv); 500 ISO; Lightroom, using the Camera Vivid film simulation; south Bristol; 30 Oct 2018.
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OUTER SUBURBS 20 – PATH THROUGH MODERN HOUSING 2

 

 


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Path between blocks of modern housing.  There is more housing behind the streetlight, fence and tall hedge.  The pipe on the outside of the house on the left is carrying the gas supply.

Earlier pictures of a paths through modern housing are here: 1 .  Each will open in a separate window.

The first image in the Outer Suburbs series, with context, is here: 1 .  Subsequent images are here: 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 .  Each will open in a separate window.

Click onto the image to open a larger version in a separate window, and click onto that image to enlarge it further.

Technique: TG-5 at 35mm (equiv); 640 ISO; Lightroom, using the Camera Vivid film simulation; south Bristol; 18 Aug 2018.
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OUTER SUBURBS 13 – STREET SCENE: ENTRANCE TO AN UNDERPASS (MONO)

 

 


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This picture is best viewed enlarged – click onto it to open a larger version in a separate window, and click onto that image to enlarge it further.

The path down to an underpass below a road, with vertical metal poles to keep out anything larger than bicycles.  Irresistibly I’m reminded of a path down to Hell, with two slim, grim, austere guardians at its entrance.

And do I believe in Hell?  Well, certainly not in any religious sense.  But I do believe that there are Hells on Earth: some of us make them for ourselves, and some of us make them for others, sometimes vast numbers of others.

The first image in the Outer Suburbs series, with context, is here: 1 .  Subsequent images are here: 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 .  Each will open in a separate window.

Technique: TG-5 at 25mm (equiv); 500 ISO; Lightroom, using the Camera Vivid film simulation; Silver Efex Pro 2, starting at the High Contrast Harsh preset; south Bristol; 27 Aug 2018.
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OUTER SUBURBS 1 – PATH THROUGH MODERN HOUSING

 

 


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I take long, early morning walks – 6 miles or more at present – to keep my waistline in check >>> and then eat and drink a lot >>> and then hope I’ll remain more or less static weightwise.  Well, everyone’s got to have a lifestyle, and there’s not the slightest doubt that these route marches are beneficial, both physically and mentally.

Just recently, I’ve been taking the Olympus TOUGH TG-5 camera along.  Its small and completely out of sight in my pocket and, should I be caught in a downpour or, then again, actually want to photograph in the rain, since its a TOUGH camera its waterproof.

So I walk around south Bristol, taking pictures of anything and everything.  At the moment, I don’t quite know where I’m going with this.  It might produce pictures rather different from those I’ve done before (like the one here maybe), it might produce unattractive images, and it might lead to multiple destinations.  Or it might lead nowhere at all.  Only time will tell.

I’ve lived in south Bristol for longer than I’ve lived anywhere else in this world, and I do have some kind of feel for it – not least that it is the smaller (and often poorer) relation of the north of the city – if there’s a lot of money in (increasingly expensive and fashionable) Bristol, not much of it is down here.  Anyway, I’m going to be photographing anything and everything “down south”, at least for awhile, and I hope you’ll enjoy the results.

I’ve walked past the scene shown above many times and, on each occasion, been visually attracted by it.  What gets to me here?  Well, the drabness and lack of windows (the pink house is most welcome!), and, in the mid- to foreground, the bland, rectilinear exteriors enlivened only by the two front doorsteps, the black water pipe, the distant satellite dish and some (also very welcome!) garden spill-over.

THE OLYMPUS TOUGH TG-5 CAMERA: LIKES, DISLIKES

This camera really is small and light, and slips completely out of sight in the pocket of my jogging bottoms (not that I actually jog, you understand …).  I could wish that it didn’t have a flaming red wriststrap but, even if I don’t use the strap and drop it, its a TOUGH camera and so ought to survive the fall onto concrete etc eminently well.

What else do I like about the TG-5?  Well, it has responsive autofocus, reasonable image stabilisation, reasonable high ISO performance, a useful 25mm-100mm zoom range (full frame equivalents) and it can shoot raw files – always wishing to do at least some post-processing, I only ever shoot raw.  Also it has a very small sensor (6.17×4.55mm!!!) and so for this sort of shot gives huge depths of focus – whereas this is NOT a camera for wafer-thin planes of focus and oodles of wonderful, dreamy bokeh!

What don’t I like?  The lack of a viewfinder and an articulated screen, but then not having these advantages is all part of its bring built like a tank so as to withstand very rough treatment.  And I prefer the colours of the images produced by the Fujifilm XT cameras, but not by a huge margin.

There is the possibility that the TG-5 will be updated soon, it is (in digital terms) getting a little long in the tooth.  But I think I’ll just stick with it, and keep my money in case I get tempted by the new Nikon full-frame mirrorless cameras, which were announced on 23 August, or my Fujifilm X-T2’s update, due in the autumn possibly, to an ???X-T3???

There is an earlier, and quite different, picture from the outer suburbs here .  But this is not the way, at least at this stage, in which I see this current new series progressing.

Click onto the image to open a larger version in a separate window, and click onto that image to enlarge it further – recommended.

Technique: TG-5 at 70mm (equiv); 320 ISO; Lightroom, using the Camera Vivid film simulation; south Bristol; 17 Aug 2018.
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BRISTOL 105 – CHRISTMAS STEPS (MONO)

 

 

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Morning sunlight blasts up Christmas Steps, an ancient thoroughfare in the city centre; 16 Sept 2016.

Close-in with a wide angle lens, low angle sunlight, and textures all around.  This was never going to be a colour image but, as always, I like to capture images in colour, and then convert them to mono post-capture with Silver Efex Pro 2.  This method does, I think, provide far more options and potential for the final image(or images) than having the camera itself shoot mono images.

Click onto the image to open a larger version in a separate window.

X-T1 with 10-24 Fujinon lens at 24mm (equiv); 1600 ISO; Silver Efex Pro 2, starting at the Film Noir 1 preset.
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GARDEN 44 – MUNTJAC 2

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Muntjac deer in the back garden, photographed through our kitchen window; 15 Feb 2014.

These small, unobtrusive deer, which were originally introduced to the UK from the Far East, live in the dense scrub – rapidly turning to Ash woodland now – on the other side of our back fence.

The garden is covered in last autumn’s dead Oak leaves, which I leave undisturbed every year, and which will be pulverised when I run our petrol mower –  aka “The Destructor” –  over the ground for this year’s first cut – which will be soon.  The green mosses on the left are covering our paved path, and are a tribute to my policy of laisser faire gardening, aka laziness.   Although I might scrape the moss off the paving stones this year … maybe …

I don’t regard this as an especially good or inspiring image.  For a start, it was taken through double glazing, and it has been muted by that experience.  But it does show our garden’s winter surface and “the beast” – and, maybe needless to say, we value the close and recurring presence of such wild creatures enormously, they mean a vast amount to us. 

Sometime ago, it could be 20 years now, I opened our kitchen curtains very early one morning to see a Roe Deer stag, antlers and all, calmly eating the blooms on our late neighbours’ roses – such encounters with wild things, be they deer, cowslips or dung beetles, are moments that to be treasured, moments that lift the spirit.

Another Muntjac shot, and some context, are here.

D800 with 70-300 Nikkor at 300mm; 4,000 ISO.
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