OUTER SUBURBS 20 – PATH THROUGH MODERN HOUSING 2

 

 


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Path between blocks of modern housing.  There is more housing behind the streetlight, fence and tall hedge.  The pipe on the outside of the house on the left is carrying the gas supply.

Earlier pictures of a paths through modern housing are here: 1 .  Each will open in a separate window.

The first image in the Outer Suburbs series, with context, is here: 1 .  Subsequent images are here: 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 .  Each will open in a separate window.

Click onto the image to open a larger version in a separate window, and click onto that image to enlarge it further.

Technique: TG-5 at 35mm (equiv); 640 ISO; Lightroom, using the Camera Vivid film simulation; south Bristol; 18 Aug 2018.
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OUTER SUBURBS 19 – MODERN HOUSING 3

 

 

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Three thoughts.

First: the cold, blank, anonymous  and often indifferent face of the Modern World.

Second: an antenna to connect the inhabitants of the Modern House with the Modern World (and, below ground, cable too).

Third: the far freer, if less secure (these days), Natural World.

There are earlier Modern Housing posts here: 1 2 : each will open in a separate window.

The first image in the Outer Suburbs series, with context, is here: 1 .  Subsequent images are here: 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 .  Each will open in a separate window.

Click onto the image to open another version in a separate window, and click onto that image to enlarge it further.

Technique: TG-5 at 53mm (equiv); 500 ISO; Lightroom, using the Camera Vivid film simulation; south Bristol; 22 Aug 2018.

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OUTER SUBURBS 17 – STORMY SUNRISE (MONO)

 

 


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A rough, stormy sky: clouds and east-facing houses catch the first, blazing rays of the rising sun.  On the right, a telegraph pole spreads its net of telephone wires to the surrounding houses, and there is another of these poles further up the road.  These are older, semi-detached houses, probably built sometime in the 1930s or 1940s.

The first image in the Outer Suburbs series, with context, is here: 1Subsequent images are here: 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16Each will open in a separate window.

Click onto the image to open a larger version in a separate window, and click onto that image to enlarge it further – recommended.

Technique: TG-5 at 57mm (equiv); 200 ISO; Lightroom, using the Camera Vivid film simulation; Silver Efex Pro 2, starting at the Full Contrast and Structure preset and adding a moderate coffee tone; south Bristol; 15 Sept 2018.
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OUTER SUBURBS 11 – MODERN HOUSING 2 (MONO)

 

 


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Modern housing.

There is an earlier Modern Housing post here: 1 .

The first image in the Outer Suburbs series, with context, is here: 1 .  Subsequent images are here: 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 .  Each will open in a separate window.

Click onto the image to open a larger version in a separate window, and click onto that image to further enlarge it – recommended.

Technique: TG-5 at  25mm (equiv); 320 ISO; Lightroom, using the Camera Vivid film simulation; Silver Efex Pro 2, starting at the Film Noir 2 preset; south Bristol; 17 Aug 2018.
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OUTER SUBURBS 10 – EVERCREECH ROAD (MONO + COLOUR)

 

 


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Many of my south Bristol photos tend towards the austere and, in Bristol, the south is the poor relation of north.  But, as you can see here, affluence is by no means absent south of the river.

This shot?  Well, the bush is growing over (“eating”!) the road sign – this is Nature and Nature never stops!  And then I decided to emphasise the bush, and to separate it from everything else, by restoring its colour.

The first image in this series, with context, is here: 1 .  Subsequent images are here: 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 .  Each will open in a separate window.

Click onto the image to open a larger version in a separate window, and click onto that image to further enlarge it.

Technique: TG-5 at 35mm (equiv); 500 ISO; Lightroom, using the Camera Vivid film simulation; Silver Efex Pro 2, starting at the Full Contrast and Structure preset and selectively restoring colour; south Bristol; 22 Aug 2018.
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OUTER SUBURBS 6 – MODERN HOUSING (MONO)

 

 

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Number 22.

The first image in this series, with context, is here: 1 .  Subsequent images are here: 2 3 4 5 .  Each will open in a separate window.

Click onto the image to open a larger version in a separate window, and click onto that image to enlarge it further – recommended.

Technique: TG-5 at 100mm (equiv); Lightroom, using the Vivid film simulation; Silver Efex Pro 2, starting at the High Structure Harsh preset; south Bristol; 18 Aug 2018.
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OUTER SUBURBS 4: WOOD PIGEON

 

 

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Living creature on nearly new architecture.  The tall fence keeps the world out.

The first image in this series, with context, is here: 1 .  Subsequent images are here: 2 3 .  Each will open in a separate window.

Click onto the image to open a  larger version in a separate window, and click onto that image to further enlarge it.

Technique: TG-5 at 100mm (equiv); 1600 ISO; Lightroom, using the Camera Vivid film simulation; south Bristol; 18 Aug 2018.
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OUTER SUBURBS 1 – PATH THROUGH MODERN HOUSING

 

 


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I take long, early morning walks – 6 miles or more at present – to keep my waistline in check >>> and then eat and drink a lot >>> and then hope I’ll remain more or less static weightwise.  Well, everyone’s got to have a lifestyle, and there’s not the slightest doubt that these route marches are beneficial, both physically and mentally.

Just recently, I’ve been taking the Olympus TOUGH TG-5 camera along.  Its small and completely out of sight in my pocket and, should I be caught in a downpour or, then again, actually want to photograph in the rain, since its a TOUGH camera its waterproof.

So I walk around south Bristol, taking pictures of anything and everything.  At the moment, I don’t quite know where I’m going with this.  It might produce pictures rather different from those I’ve done before (like the one here maybe), it might produce unattractive images, and it might lead to multiple destinations.  Or it might lead nowhere at all.  Only time will tell.

I’ve lived in south Bristol for longer than I’ve lived anywhere else in this world, and I do have some kind of feel for it – not least that it is the smaller (and often poorer) relation of the north of the city – if there’s a lot of money in (increasingly expensive and fashionable) Bristol, not much of it is down here.  Anyway, I’m going to be photographing anything and everything “down south”, at least for awhile, and I hope you’ll enjoy the results.

I’ve walked past the scene shown above many times and, on each occasion, been visually attracted by it.  What gets to me here?  Well, the drabness and lack of windows (the pink house is most welcome!), and, in the mid- to foreground, the bland, rectilinear exteriors enlivened only by the two front doorsteps, the black water pipe, the distant satellite dish and some (also very welcome!) garden spill-over.

THE OLYMPUS TOUGH TG-5 CAMERA: LIKES, DISLIKES

This camera really is small and light, and slips completely out of sight in the pocket of my jogging bottoms (not that I actually jog, you understand …).  I could wish that it didn’t have a flaming red wriststrap but, even if I don’t use the strap and drop it, its a TOUGH camera and so ought to survive the fall onto concrete etc eminently well.

What else do I like about the TG-5?  Well, it has responsive autofocus, reasonable image stabilisation, reasonable high ISO performance, a useful 25mm-100mm zoom range (full frame equivalents) and it can shoot raw files – always wishing to do at least some post-processing, I only ever shoot raw.  Also it has a very small sensor (6.17×4.55mm!!!) and so for this sort of shot gives huge depths of focus – whereas this is NOT a camera for wafer-thin planes of focus and oodles of wonderful, dreamy bokeh!

What don’t I like?  The lack of a viewfinder and an articulated screen, but then not having these advantages is all part of its bring built like a tank so as to withstand very rough treatment.  And I prefer the colours of the images produced by the Fujifilm XT cameras, but not by a huge margin.

There is the possibility that the TG-5 will be updated soon, it is (in digital terms) getting a little long in the tooth.  But I think I’ll just stick with it, and keep my money in case I get tempted by the new Nikon full-frame mirrorless cameras, which were announced on 23 August, or my Fujifilm X-T2’s update, due in the autumn possibly, to an ???X-T3???

There is an earlier, and quite different, picture from the outer suburbs here .  But this is not the way, at least at this stage, in which I see this current new series progressing.

Click onto the image to open a larger version in a separate window, and click onto that image to enlarge it further – recommended.

Technique: TG-5 at 70mm (equiv); 320 ISO; Lightroom, using the Camera Vivid film simulation; south Bristol; 17 Aug 2018.
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STILL LIFE 180 – ACCOMMODATION

 

 


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Apartments beside the river.

Turning this image onto its side makes it more abstract, as do the reflections.  The combination of blue and orange gets to me.

Click onto the image to open a larger version in a separate window, and click onto that image to further enlarge it.

Technique: X-T2 with 55-200 Fujinon lens at 305mm (equiv); 1600 ISO; Lightroom, using the Velvia/Vivid film simulation; rotated 90 degrees clockwise; opposite Welsh Back, central Bristol; 15 Dec 2017.
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STILL LIFE 66 – CHALET 5: THE VIEW FROM THE CHALET (MONO)

 

 

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On a cheapo holiday last spring, we were very comfortably accommodated in a two storey chalet – well, actually, it could very easily pass muster as a house.  And relaxing with the time to look around, I took quite a few photos of things within the chalet that caught my eye.  Some of these pictures have already been posted here – you can find them here, here, here and here.

And lolling back on a sofa, a favourite occupation, especially in the late afternoons, I looked to my right through the chalet’s open door and saw the lowering sun making light and shadow on the chalets opposite our’s.  And – and this is really decadence gone mad, not really as bad as Nero fiddling while Rome burned, but getting there – and I remember putting down my glass of Belgian beer and, still lolling, picking up the damn great Nikon which was lying on the sofa beside me, and starting firing through the open door.

It was always going to be about light, shadow, shapes and texture, and so I’ve converted the image to gritty and quite contrasty black and white, using Silver Efex Pro 2, the software that no one serious about black and white digital photography should be without.

The roof on the far right makes a diagonal shadow across the house front; and the the shadow of the tree on the building on the left and those few tree branches sticking out from behind that building, both add something living and organic to the scene.

Click onto the image to open a larger version in a separate window.

D800 with 70-300 Nikkor lens at 195mm; 200 ISO; Silver Efex Pro 2.  Near Perranporth, Cornwall; 11 Apr 2016.
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