ARCHIVE: LEVELS 29 – FLOODED FIELD

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The tips of coarse marsh grasses protruding from floodwater on Tadham Moor, on the Somerset Levels; 23 Nov 2012.

Click upon this image to open a larger version in a separate window – certainly recommended.

I’d had thoughts about cropping in more closely on this image, to better show the grasses, but I’m sticking with this version because I think that the surrounding negative space gives the image “room to breathe” – ie it is not cramped, and it gives more of a sense of the isolation and desolation that the floods have brought.

Technique: D700 with 70-300 Nikkor lens at 300mm; 200 ISO.
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OUTER SUBURBS 311 – DANCER

 

 


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Walking in the frosty sunrise, and squeezing into the shadow of a tree – getting a tree’s eye view perhaps …    But when you’re as bulky as me, squeezing in can be quite tricky – the bulge on the right of the trunk’s shadow may be my elbow.

The tree’s shadow is moving as the sun rises: on the left of the trunk’s shadow there is a halo of white, still unmelted frost, only just exposed to the sun’s weak winter rays.

And when I look at this image I see a dancer, perhaps a woman in a long dress, inclining her head to the left and raising her arms in celebration of the new morning’s warmth and light.

Click onto the image to open a larger version in a separate window.

Technique: TG-5 at 70mm (equiv); 400 ISO; spot metering; Lightroom, starting at the Modern 05 profile; south Bristol; 26 Feb 2021.
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ARCHIVE: LEVELS 19 – LOOKING PAST GRASSES, TOWARDS TREES

 

 


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Looking at a grove of trees on Common Moor.  Sitting relatively low down in the car, I was able to look through these grasses towards the grove of trees.  The fine, pale, elongated specks in the image, best seen when it is enlarged, are falling raindrops – the shutter speed was 1/320th second.

This archive presents some of the pictures that I’ve taken on the Somerset Levels over many years.  More context can be found in the first post in this archive – 1 – and also in my first Somerset Levels post, from 2011 – here .  Further posts in this archive are here: 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 .  All of these links will open in separate windows. 

Click onto this image to open a larger version in a separate window – recommended.

Technique: Z 6 with 70-300 Nikkor lens at 300mm; 6400 ISO; Lightroom, starting at the Camera Standard v2 profile; Chasey’s Drove, on Common Moor north of Glastonbury, on the Somerset Levels; 19 July 2019.

SOMERSET LEVELS: SOME KEYWORDS

And finally – some keywords that will often be mentioned in this archive series:

Droves:  to avoid crossing other peoples’ land when accessing their own, the farmers constructed a series of tracks, known as droves, between the fields. Some of these droves are now metalled roads and many persist as open tracks – all of which allow wonderfully open access to this countryside.

Rhynes: the fields are bounded by water-filled ditches – which both drain the ground and act as stock barriers. Hence strange landscapes – where fields appear quite unbounded, except for a gate with a short length of fencing on either side of it, where a bridge crosses the water-filled boundary ditch to provide access the field.  These small wet ditches communicate with larger rhynes (“reen” as in Doreen), which in turn flow into larger drains, e.g. the North and South Drains in the Brue Valley. All of these waterways are manmade and, by intricate series of pumping stations and flood gates, all of them have their water levels controlled by local farmers, internal drainage boards or the Environment Agency.

Pollarded Willows: the banks of the rhynes were often planted with Willow trees, both to help strengthen the banks and also to show the courses of roads and tracks during floods. These Willows are often pollarded, i.e. their upper branches are cut off, which results in distinctively broad and dense heads to the trees. Pollarding keeps trees to a required height, while ensuring a steady supply of wood – more important in the past than now – for fires, thatching spars, fencing and so on.

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OUTER SUBURBS 293 – ROADSIDE GRASS

 

 


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Roadside grass, rather eerily manicured in between the confluence of two pavements, one of which enters the frame from the left and the other from upper right.  Never let it be said that the Outer Suburbs lack style and class …

Click onto the image to open a larger version in a separate window.

Technique:  TG-5 at 25mm (equiv); 640 ISO; Lightroom, starting at the Modern 01 profile; south Bristol; 15 Nov 2020.
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OUTER SUBURBS 279 – MORNING SUNLIGHT ON GRASS

 

 


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Standing on a lawn, beside a fence, as the sun rose.

Click onto the “early morning” tag (below) to see more images from the early hours of the day.  

Click onto the image to open a larger version in a separate window – recommended.

Technique: TG-5 at 46mm (equiv); 400 ISO; spot metering; Lightroom, starting at the Modern 01 profile; south Bristol; 27 Aug 2020.
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OUTER SUBURBS 274 – TREE AMONGST DEAD GRASSES (MONO)

 

 


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Click onto the image to open a larger version in a separate window – recommended.

Technique: TG-5 at 46mm (equiv); 800 ISO; spot metering; Lightroom. starting at the B&W Green Filter profile; south Bristol; 11 Aug 2020.

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ARCHIVE KENYA 65 – WHITE-BELLIED BUSTARD

 

 


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White-bellied Bustard moving through parched grassland in Nairobi National Park; 20 Oct 1977.

Although capable of sustained flight, bustards breed in a nest on the ground and spend most of their lives walking through fairly open country, feeding on invertebrates and seeds.

Click onto the image to open a larger version in a separate window – recommended.

Technique: OM-2 with 75-150 Zuiko lens at 150mm; Kodak Ektachrome colour slide.

THE ARCHIVE KENYA SERIES

I’m re-posting photographs that I took in Kenya over 30 years ago.  You can find more context here .  Click onto the “Archive Kenya” tag (below) to see more of these film images from Kenya.

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ARCHIVE KENYA 55 – COMMON WATERBUCK

 

 


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Female Common Waterbuck, and a male further back on the left; Nairobi National Park; June 1980.

The ‘long’ rains  have produced a lush growth of grass which, in the ensuing drier conditions, is now starting to turn brown and wither.

Click onto the image to open a larger version in a separate window.

Technique: Kodak Ektachrome colour slide film.

THE ARCHIVE KENYA SERIES

I’m re-posting photographs that I took in Kenya over 30 years ago.  You can find more context here .  Click onto the “Archive Kenya” tag (below) to see more of these film images from Kenya.

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ARCHIVE 518 – MY GARDEN AND ME

 

 


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“My Garden and Me”; 4 May 2008.  Cowslips and Forget-Me-Nots, which are always left to go completely to seed before being mown, form a glowing and increasingly large patch of yellow and blue in our garden each spring.

The apparent falling away of the ground around my feet is due to the distortion produced by the fisheye lens when it is pointed away from the horizontal.

Click onto the image to open a larger version in a separate window – recommended.

Technique: F6 with Sigma 15mm full frame fisheye; Fuji Provia 400X colour slide film, rated at 500 ISO.
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ARCHIVE 493 – EARLY MORNING GARDEN 9

 

 


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Seeding grasses; 25 June 2013: part of a project I was doing in my back garden, in Bristol, seven years ago.  I get up early on the morning anyway, and so the project’s simple plan was to down a cup of strong tea and get out into the garden early in the day, using mainly this 70-300 telezoom (the lens I continue to be married to) or a 105mm macro lens.  >>> but  LOL!!! >>> I tend to be a little less athletic and supple now than I was then so that, if I were to attempt such photos again, I may need the emergency services to get me back up onto my feet!  Well, after all, one must suffer for one’s art … 🙂 …

For those looking at composition, my eye tends to start appraising the image from the left, and is initially caught by the in focus subject of the shot, which is set against a somewhat darker background.

This subject is mirrored by the similarly orientated (i.e. repeating patterns) but out of focus stems further back, which are set against, and which tend to blend into, a rather paler backdrop.  These diffuse stems give the shot depth.

Technique: D700 with 70-300 Nikkor lens at 300mm; 800 ISO.

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