ARCHIVE 608 – DRINKING GLASS IN FRONT OF VENETIAN BLINDS, ROTATED (MONO)

 

 


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Drinking glass in front of venetian blinds, Hayling Island, Hampshire; 21 Sept 2010.

During one of our cheapo caravan holidays, a drinking glass stands in front of window blinds.  Light leaking in through the blinds makes strong (now) vertical stripes.  Just below the (now) upper side of the drinking glass, the glass’s curvature distorts the blind’s straight slats. 

The light inside the caravan causes the glass to cast a thin, dark shadow on the blind, below the glass as we now see it.

I’ve added lots of grain and strong copper toning in SEP2.  Clockwise rotation has turned the glass tumbler into a more abstract object.

Click onto the image to open a larger version in a separate window.

Technique: D700 with 70-300 Nikkor lens at 180mm; 200 ISO; Silver Efex Pro 2’s Film Noir 1 preset and strong copper toning; rotated 90 degrees clockwise.

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HOME 4 – MY FAVOURITE TIPPLE!

 

 


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As you may be aware, The FATman is an inveterate imbiber of top quality Belgian beer.  I have tasted many Belgian brews, but for some years now have (delightedly and enthusiastically!) standardised on Duvel, which is an absolutely glorious Belgian strong blond ale – with taste, after-taste, texture and … 8.5% alcohol – so, not something you pour down your throat with gay abandon, unless you have a desire to become senseless and horizontal quite speedily.

Shown above, here is golden Duvel in its own, large, tulip-shaped glass, which has been specifically designed to contain this beer’s often towering white head.  Its can be unwise to whip the tops off bottles of Belgian beers as they will often enthusiastically come out to meet you, to say hello, and to end up all over your clothes and the floor.  And Duvel is absolutely no exception, caution is needed and, after the bottle’s top is off, then the correct pouring angle is needed –  if only to avoid my wife’s comments when I emerge from an accident with perhaps one centimetre of golden ale in the bottom of one of these huge glasses – and the rest filled with bright white foam …

Since 1871, Duvel has been made by the Moortgat Brewery in Puurs – and this town has now achieved even more fame by also containing the Pfizer lab that has started producing vast amounts of covid19 vaccine.

And if all this were not enough, Moortgat Brewery now also produces the simply sublime Duvel Tripel Hop Citra, which is stronger (9.5%) and even more delicious!

I’m being spoilt: both of these wonderful beers are available in our local supermarket >>> but whether this will continue after the current acrimonious Brexit trade talks is anyone’s guess!

Click onto the image to open a larger version in a separate window.

Technique: TG-5 at 38mm (equiv); 400 ISO; Lightroom, starting at the Camera Natural profile; my favourite armchair; 18 Sept 2020.
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BRISTOL 166 – AT LUNCH, DRINKING WATER (MONO)

 

 


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Carafe and glass on a wooden table top: a cool drink before the food arrives.

More images from Browns restaurant can be found by clicking onto the Browns tag below – recommended.

Click onto the image to open a larger version in a separate window – recommended.

Technique: X-T2 with 10-24 Fujinon lens at 36mm (equiv); 800 ISO; centre-weighted average metering; Lightroom, using the Camera Astia/Soft profile; Silver Efex Pro 2, starting at the Full Spectrum Inverse preset and adding a moderate Coffee tone; Capture NX2; Browns restaurant, central Bristol; 28 Apr 2017.
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OUTER SUBURBS 191 – SODA WATER WITH ICE AND A SLICE OF LEMON

 

 


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At lunch in the outer suburbs.

Click onto the image to open a larger version in a separate window.

Technique: TG-5 at 100mm (equiv); 1600 ISO; spot metering; Lightroom, starting at the Camera Vivid profile; south Bristol; 10 Feb 2020.
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OUTER SUBURBS 163 – GLASS OF WINE WITH DISTANT DRINKER (MONO)

 

 


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Sitting in a local pub, awaiting their Festive Meal, which is more or less a complete Christmas dinner, but served up for many weeks before The Great Consumer Festival itself magically dawns.  The food is really quite good, and inexpensive too >>> and this Meal was my second act of devotion (nay, of downright enthusiasm!) at this particularly festive culinary shrine, and my wife’s third.

While waiting for food to arrive, I got the TG-5 out and started looking at things. For human interest, there was the genial soul at the bar, downing pints of cider like there was no tomorrow and, to the evident alarm of the barmaids, revealing that he’d just been thrown out of the pub next door for threatening to burn it down.  But I was looking for a still life – or at least a stiller and less incendiary life – and so to my wife’s glass of wine.

The subject itself is obvious, while the curving, tilting, patterned surface behind is the table top, catching the light.  Something of a Minimalist image really, I suppose, but if you turn your screen upside down (or stand on your head, if that’s what gets to you) and carefully look at the glass, you will see the reflection within of an elderly drinker (yes … that’s right … someone just a bit younger than me …), sitting near us, downing a beer.  Ah, that Old Consumer Magic … already here …

Click onto the image twice to see an enlarged version.

Technique: TG-5 at 80mm (equiv); 3200 ISO; spot metering; Lightroom, starting at the B&W 03 profile; south Bristol; 10 Dec 2019.
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STILL LIFE 249 – GLASS OF WINE

 

 


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My wife’s glass of wine, in a Bristol pub.

There is another photo of a glass of wine here.

Click onto the image to open a larger version in a separate window, and click onto that image to further enlarge it.

Technique: Canon G11 PowerShot at 96mm (equiv); 3200 ISO; Lightroom; 29 July 2016.

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ARCHIVE 354 – MY WIFE’S GLASS OF WINE (MONO + COLOUR)

 

 


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A final shot of my wife’s glass of wine, this time in black and white with some restored colour; 16 Mar 2014.

Two earlier images in this series, along with more context, are here and here – recommended.

As always, mono simplifies the scene.  The bright tips of the fork assume new prominence – a short and slightly sinuous line of bright points –  and the wine’s restored colour resembles an inferno in a glass.  Nuclear fission?  Well, hardly, I mean its only rosé … but fill a glass, a bigger, balloon-type glass is best,  with Moortgat’s Duvel  or Westmalle’s Tripel (and drinking these delights at anything but room temperature is, of course, unthinkable)  … and you might feel both shaken … and stirred …

Click onto the image to open a larger version in a separate window – recommended.

Technique: D700 with 70-300 Nikkor lens at 240mm; 800 ISO; Silver Efex Pro 2, starting at the Film Noir 1 preset.

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STILL LIFE 138 – GLASS OF BEER 2

 

 


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Amber nectar?  No, not really, its only Stella Artois – but its in our faces and bubbling, and I like the effect.

The first glass of beer image is here Thinking about it, it may even be the same glass of beer (depending on how fast I was drinking at the time), but I think I prefer this closer in, simpler version, with its more clearly seen bubbles.

Click onto the image to open a larger version in a separate window, and click onto that version to enlarge it yet again.

Technique: Canon G11 PowerShot at 140mm (equiv); 800 ISO; Lightroom, using the Camera Standard film simulation, Bristol; 10 Feb 2017.
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STILL LIFE 81 – GLASS OF BEER

 

 

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A glass (actually several glasses) of beer with lunch, in a local pub which produces quite simple, tasty food.

I say beer, but actually its lager, and (to my shame) actually its Stella Artois.  OK, OK, I may be something of a beer snob, but the simple fact is that I like beers (and one or two lagers too) that have great mouthfuls of fine flavours and aftertastes – so that I am, or course, more or less married to the beers of Belgium.  OK, OK (again, again!), Stella Artois is Belgian too, and if its adequate (if a little strong) for washing down food with – cold soda water does just as well really –  it cannot compare at all with Belgium’s real, quality beers, which have an almost unimaginable variety of truly wonderful flavours.

My favourites?  Well, my staple is the pale Duvel, a Belgian classic, which at 8.5% alcohol is really not something you knock back in pints!  Not unless you yourself want to be on your back too of course.  And then there are the Dubbel and the Tripel produced by the Trappist monastery at Westmalle.  I’m not a gourmet, I’m not sure I have a very sensitive palate, but I simply glory in these beers and many others.

Technique: anyway, we went for lunch in this pub and, as usually happens, there was a delay between ordering our food and receiving it.  And sitting there, sipping our drinks and chatting, there was time to look around at everything.  My wife had her back to the window and I was facing into the light, so that my glass of drink shone golden in front of me.  So out came the relatively small and unobtrusive G11 and, looking down into its wonderful, fully articulated screen, the golden chalice looked good.  But, unless I filled the frame with the drink, there might well arise problems with obtrusive things in the background which, even if not in focus, can completely ruin any image.  So it was a question of manoeuvring from side to side around the glass to find a simple and relatively unobtrusive backdrop – that either would not disrupt the picture as it was, or which could have its obtrusive features subdued by post-processing.  I ended up with a compromise between these two outcomes.

Click onto the image to open a larger version in a separate window.

Technique: Canon G11 PowerShot at 140mm (equiv); 1600 ISO; Lightroom; 10 Feb 2017.
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PEOPLE 233 – READING A NEWSPAPER 1

 

 

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Turning the page of a newspaper in a Bristol pub, with a half pint of bubbling shandy standing ready to hand; 2 Sept 2016.

I don’t use this little Canon camera much these days but, with its fully articulated screen and highly accessible controls, its very handy in changing and close-in situations, and it shoots Raw. 

It usually accompanies me on visits to pubs, its very good to have to hand – just in case.

Click onto the image to open a larger version in a separate window.

Canon G11 PowerShot at 83mm (equiv); 1600 ISO.
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