BRISTOL 102 – VIEW INTO A RESTAURANT 2

 

 

view-into-a-restaurant-2
.
Another look in through the windows of this restaurant, the first look being here; 14 July 2016.

 In this case, something easier to compose with, albeit that hard reality may be in short supply.

And that flower in the shadows at top right is not looking at you.

Click onto the image to open a larger version in a separate window – recommended.

There is a third restaurant interior here.

X-T1 with 55-200 Fujinon lens at 305mm (equiv); 3200 ISO.

.
.
.

BRISTOL 100 – VIEW INTO A RESTAURANT

 

 

view-into-a-restaurant
.
Looking in through a restaurant window, Bristol Harbourside; 14 July 2016.

Looking in through this window, I was at once taken with the single, beautiful flower, caught by the light.  But, there being all sorts of visual rubbish off to the left, I could not make the flower anywhere near central in the composition, nor get it near to any of the compositional thirds.  I could of course have tried portrait (ie vertical) format, but this seemed a waste of all that diffuse, half-seen, “restauranty” detail off to the right – table cloths, more glasses, cutlery, upholstery.

And so to this.  Westerners’ eyes often enter images from the left, perhaps because we write from left to right – I’ve often talked about this on this blog in the past.  So,  in this case, my eyes enter this image from the left and run visually slap bang into the flower and its attendant glassware, sharp and well lit in the summer sunlight – and are for a moment held there. 

But as I look at the bloom and its reflective attendants, my eyes keep wandering off to the right, wondering what’s there – only to be dragged back to the flower again. 

Do your eyes do the same, or do you see this differently?  Is the flower really too far left?  What do you think?

Click onto the image to open a larger version in a separate window.

X-T1 with 55-200 Fujinon lens at 305mm (equiv); 3200 ISO.
.
.
.

ARCHIVE 205 – TEAZEL ALONG TRIPPS DROVE (MONO + COLOUR)

 

 

lev_247aX
.
Teazel along Tripps Drove; Godney Moor, on the Somerset Levels; 26 Jul 2012.

I don’t take many pictures of flowers, but early one peaceful and gorgeous morning along Tripps Drove I saw these Teazels beside a water-filled ditch – just before, my attention distracted, a horsefly had his fill from me.

And here, for once, I’ve given SEP2 its head and followed where it led – the Yellowed 2 preset looked good and here it is border and all, along with some minor adjustments, and also extensive restoration of colour.

D700 with 70-300 Nikkor at 270mm; 400 ISO; converted to mono and re-coloured using Silver Efex Pro 2.

.
.
.

ARCHIVE 178 – WINDBLOWN

 

 

newq_0094X
.
Windblown poppy; Newquay, Cornwall; 11 Sept 2013.

I like Newquay.  It is cheap, tatty and unpretentious, and there are so many establishments offering Full English Breakfasts that I could probably stay there for a whole month and eat in a different one each day.  That said, I have the strong suspicion that most of these repasts would be of the pallid and rather tasteless variety but, still, anywhere with this number of breakfasts on offer can’t be all bad.

And, with its famous Fistral Beach facing out into the Atlantic’s rollers,  this little town is a mecca for UK surfers – as well as being the pub, nightclub and “booze / drug yourself silly” capital of the west for youngsters intent upon a good time that they may not remember too much about.

We had a couple of dry days on our short break, but the westerly wind blew throughout and the great white waves smashed into the cliffs and headlands – not that we are in any way surfers, mind!  For a start I can’t swim, and neither of us are at all into such energetic activities. 

There was a ragged flowerbed in front of some kind of religious building sandwiched in between the Houses Of Hedonism along the main drag, and the gusting westerly was sending the flowers in all directions. The waving poppies stood out from the rest, and a quarter of a second at F29 gave this pale and Impressionistic result.

D800 with 70-300 Nikkor at 300mm; 400 ISO.

.
.
.

STILL LIFE 26 – DYING FLOWER

 

 

dying-flower
.
Dying flower; 25 Aug 2015.

My wife grows flowers in pots outside our front door and I like these big splashes of colour.  But, an English “summer”, and now a month with an “r” in it – and there are many more of those to come, right through to April.

And so wind and rain tore off a large bloom and left it, wilting fast, on our front path.

And so to carrying the dying thing indoors and putting it on the table.  Whereupon all sorts of very much alive wildlife appeared from out of its folds, only to march off with far more purpose than I can usually muster.

And so to looking at this riot of colour and setting up a camera, to produce a picture of something transient; something that was once like this but that is changing fast. 

And emotions?  Well, sadness at the universality of the transience I suppose, but also great joy at the many forms that Life can attain while it is up and running.  Many things in this world are boring, but Life will never be one of them.

D800 with 105mm Nikkor; tripod; 100 ISO; Color Efex Pro 4.
.
.
.

ARCHIVE 113 – 1970s ANEMONES, PAST THEIR BEST

 

 

Anemone
.

Anemones, going over and past their best, photographed in Bristol in the late 1970s.

Although its over 30 years ago, I can still remember being attracted by the colours, and the fact that these blooms were starting to deteriorate.  And I had a tripod, and time on my hands.

The thoughts that I had about these images then are still with me now.  To me, the upper photo is a portrait of a living being, with a dark hat or hair of feathers or something, and he/she/it is looking straight at me – confrontationally maybe.  There is some falloff of focus at upper left in the lower shot, but what gets to me here are the sheens, textures and colours on the tumbling and convoluted surfaces of those dying petals.

Tripod-mounted Olympus OM-1 with the ? 75-150 Zuiko? lens, plus extension tubes or close up lenses; Agfa CT18 colour slides, rated at 64 ISO to further saturate colour.

.

ADL253X

.
.
.

GARDEN 60 – LYING DOWN ON THE LAWN

 

Lying down on the lawn
.
Near to ground level, on our back lawn; 15 July 2014.

At my (in truth, not vastly advanced) age, the problem with getting down there and enjoying things like this is, increasingly, getting back up again.

D800 with 105mm Nikkor; 400 ISO; Color Efex Pro 4.
.
.
.

GARDEN 53 – CLOVER

 

 

Clover in our garden
.
Clover standing proud of the rough lawn near the bottom of our garden; 15 July 2014.

In the background, an out of focus mass of hazel, oak, and probably glimpses of the warm brick of our house too. 

And getting down to photograph at ground level is not too bad during the descent, wonderful and inspirational when you’re down there, but rather more of a strain on the ascent …

D800 with 105mm Nikkor; 500 ISO.
.
.
.

GARDEN 47 – PLANTAIN (MONO)

 

 

Plantain in our Bristol garden

.

Plantain from our Bristol garden; 22 June 2014.

Taking my life (and my plant guide) in my hands, I’m going to identify this as the Ribwort Plantain.  And this is the first denizen of our front garden that I’ve pictured.  Not that it was in the front garden when I pictured it.  Seeing these plantains – plants that I’ve always liked – beside our front gate, I held back The Destructor (our petrol mower) from roaring and ravaging over them and instead let it roar and ravage around them, so that I could preserve them and bring a bloom indoors.

And if this is indeed the Ribwort Plantain, my little book tells me that its one of the commonest European plants – and also that it grows in “grassy and waste places”, which describes our diminutive and scraggy front garden to a tee.

D800 with 105mm Nikkor; 100 ISO; tripod; Silver Efex Pro 2, starting at the Landscape preset.
.
.
.

SOMERSET LEVELS 157 – SACRIFICE (MONO)

USE YOUR PC’s F11 KEY TO VIEW THIS PAGE FULLSCREEN

.


.
Beside Middle Drove Rhyne, south of Catcott Burtle; 3 June 2014.

A roadside flower, looking as if it is being offered up as some kind of sacrifice to the darkness.  The dimly seen rhyne and its fringing reeds are behind.  (Rhyne rhymes with “scene”, and is the local name for the small waterways that, as here, form the boundaries of fields.).

I was out on the Levels looking for the big cat (i.e. as in substantially larger than Domestic Cats), which a local farmer has seen in the area many times.  I found the rough, stony track the farmer mentioned and searched extensively, but at this time of year the vegetation has grown up so much that the creature could have been feet from me and still totally invisible.  It seemed odd to be carefully and unobtrusively scanning terrain through binoculars again, something I’ve done very little of since giving up birdwatching over a decade ago.

And it was a sad day too, for a very favourite pub – Ye Olde Burtle Inn at Catcott Burtle – was closed and derelict, soon to be replaced by new houses.  It was a delightful old place, with open fires, settees, newspapers and magasines, stuffed wildlife from long ago up in glass cases around the walls, a skittles alley, onions and herbs hanging from the ceilings, good beer and cider – and a Sunday Carvery (complete with trolley of homemade desserts) to die for!  A fond memory is that the gammon steak, cut to the customer’s choice and priced by the ounce, came as standard with four fried eggs – I remember the chef’s look of utter astonishment when I thought that I could only manage two – “You don’t want four fried eggs?!”.  I must have been a little under the weather that day.

D700 with 12-24 Sigma at 12mm; 200 ISO; Silver Efex Pro 2, starting at the High Contrast Harsh preset.
.
.
.

%d bloggers like this: