PEOPLE 395 – CHRISTMAS CHEER

 

 


.
Contemplating cold reality in the Season of Good Cheer: waiting for a bus in the morning rush hour.  Christmas seems so long ago now, and as far away and inaccessible as this tree is – inside the glass in the warm – from this man, who is outside the glass in the cold. 

Still, the only way is forward – as I read on blogs this morning, we should try to concentrate on the here and now and not be brought down by the prospect of what may be ahead.  This seems good advice.  Some recent thoughts on coronavirus are here .

Click onto the image to open a larger version in a separate window.

Technique: X-T2 with 55-200 Fujinon lens at 300mm (equiv); 6400 ISO; Lightroom, starting at the Camera Astia/Soft profile; central Bristol; 15 Dec 2017.
.
.
.

PEOPLE 389 – GOING TO WORK 101

 

 


.

Two worlds.  Above: reality, what things are actually like, how things actually are.  (For “things”, perhaps I should say, “Life”)

Below: marketing, persuasive design, imagined realities – how those intent on profiting from Consumerism’s great festival would like us to believe things are.

Click onto the image to open a larger version in a separate window – recommended.

Technique: Z 6 with 70-300 Nikkor lens used in APS-C format to give 450mm; 6400 ISO; in-camera production of jpeg from the raw file, using the Vivid profile; Bristol city centre; 29 Nov 2019.

Recent Going to Work posts are here: 93 94 95 96 97 98 99 100 . Each will open in a separate window. (Post 100 contains selected images from the first 99 posts.)  

GOING TO WORK: THE EARLIER POSTS: 1-92.

You can see a summary of the Going to Work series here .

Earlier images from this series can be found here: 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 45 46 47 48 49 50 51 52 53 54 55 56 57 58 59 60 61 62 63 64 65 66 67 68 69 70 71 72 73 74 75 76 77 78 79 80 81 82 83 84 85 86 87 88 89 90 91 92 . Each will open in a separate window.

.
.
.

BRISTOL 159 – STREET SCENE 1

 

 

.
Out on Bristol’s streets: restaurant frontage decorated for Christmas; early morning.

Click onto the image twice to open an enlarged version in a separate window – recommended.

Technique: Z 6 with 70-300 Nikkor lens at 300mm; 6400 ISO; Lightroom, starting at the Camera Pop profile; central Bristol; 29 Nov 2019.
.
.
.

PEOPLE 386 – SELFIE WITH FATHER CHRISTMAS, SNOWMAN AND WARNING ABOUT WET FLOOR

 

 


.

Down a dull sidestreet in a seaside town, and this last vestige of overhyped festive cheer – still warm and bright despite early January’s gloom, drizzle and inescapable realities.

Click onto the image twice to open a larger version in a separate window – recommended.

Technique: Z 6 with 24-120 Nikkor lens at 48mm; 12,800 ISO; Lightroom, starting at the Camera Flat v2 profile; Weston-super-Mare, Somerset; 3 Jan 2020.
.
.
.

BRISTOL 158 – HAPPY CHRISTMAS!!!

 

 


.

HAPPY CHRISTMAS EVERYONE, AND THE HOPE THAT 2020

WILL TREAT YOU ALL KINDLY.

.

AND THOUGHTS TOO FOR THOSE IN THIS WORLD WHO ARE SUFFERING ADVERSITY >>> HOPE TOO FOR THEM,  IRRESPECTIVE OF THEIR RACE, CREED, NATIONALITY, GENDER, SEXUAL ORIENTATION, AGE, DISABILITIES, ETC ETC >>> ALL THE USUAL SUSPECTS! – WHICH OUR SPECIES SO HABITUALLY USES AS THE BASES FOR DIVISION, HATRED AND OPPRESSION.

.

Christmas lights over central Bristol – click onto the image twice to view an enlarged version in a separate window.
.
.
.

STANTON DREW 56 – HAPPY CHRISTMAS!!!

 

 


.
A back entry in the village – festively, but very simply, adorned: HAPPY CHRISTMAS!  🙂 🙂 🙂

Earlier images from this early morning shoot are here: 1 (with context) 2 .

Click onto the image to open a larger version in a separate window, and click onto that image to enlarge it yet again.

Technique: X-T2 with 55-200 Fujinon lens at 83mm (equiv); 6400 ISO; Lightroom, using the Velvia/Vivid film simulation; Stanton Drew, in the Chew Valley south of Bristol; 14 Dec 2018.
.
.
.

OUTER SUBURBS 51 – CAN’T RESIST THIS – HAPPY CHRISTMAS!!!

 

 


.
Thought you might like to see this.  I was out walking this morning, right on the edge of south Bristol, where the outer suburbs melt into the countryside, and by the side of the wonderfully named Washing Pound Lane I found this.  The person living here apparently has a reputation for making such tableaux where his/her field gate opens onto the lane, but this is the first I’ve seen.  Politically correct this isn’t, which is something of a breath of fresh air, but at least the playful stereotyping is directed at both genders – and then there’s the plea for death threats to be sent to Santa – who has his stash of booze already laid in, it seems!

Many houses in this area are decorated externally with lights, inflated Santas, reindeer, snowmen, etc, and that’s fine.  But this is different, this is something from the past maybe – s/he has had an idea, rummaged around the house to find the necessary stuff, and gone for it.  To me, this brings back something from my childhood, a time – in the 1950s – when kids played on the streets, when TV was only just starting up, and when life in general was rather simpler and less frenetic.

But, this being reality, there’s also a serious side here, not least in the strands of barbed wire adorning the top of the gate – maybe previous displays have been vandalised, maybe the field has been invaded at other times too.  This is an unwelcome reminder that all is not sweetness and light.

And also, while Washing Pound Lane is currently a virtually single track, rural lane – mainly bounded by open fields – a thoroughfare that presumably originated as an unmade road in the era of horses and carts, it is now one of the options for the route of a large and very busy main road that is going to link two other busy main roads on Bristol’s outskirts, and so prevent some through traffic having to enter the city.  There are also plans to build 1200 new houses nearby, and a similar number a little further inside the city.

And so as I walk in this area and enjoy its mainly calm, quiet, countryside atmosphere, I’m only too conscious that I’m seeing the last of it, that all is set to change very markedly.  I regret this but, as always trying to be realistic, I think it inevitable – especially on a city’s perimeter.  And after all, people need roofs over their heads, that’s the bottom line, and infrastructure too.

The first image in the Outer Suburbs series, with context, is here: 1 .  Subsequent images are here: 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 45 46 47 48 49 50 .  Each will open in a separate window.

Click onto the image to open a larger version in a separate window, and click onto that image to enlarge it further – recommended.

Technique: TG-5 at 25mm (equiv); 800 ISO; Lightroom, using the Camera Vivid film preset; south Bristol; 19 Dec 2018.
.
.
.

OUTER SUBURBS 43 – CHRISTMAS IS HERE

 

 

Christmas is here: 1

.

Christmas is here: 2

Christmas.  What does Christmas mean to me, what do I think about it?  Well, four things to mention.

First, as I see Christmas in the UK, its really a time for children.  I can well remember its magic 60 and more years ago and, regardless of how many of the myths children here do or don’t believe now, its still a magical time for them (and an increasingly expensive one for their parents).  I approach every Christmas hoping that the few children that I know, at least, will be happy.

Second, “The Christmas Story” and the other religious sides to Christmas are simply not me.  As Bob Dylan so succinctly put it in The Mighty Quinn: “It ain’t my cup of meat”.

And a common saying here is that Christmas is the Season of Goodwill whereas, being a bit picky perhaps, I’d prefer goodwill to be around during all the other seasons too 😉 .

And finally, I’m amazed by the vast and almost hysterical, materialistic and commercialised juggernaut that Christmas has become in the UK.  The two pictures here are not intended to allude to any connections between Christmas and the gutter, but to me they are symbolic of this vast commercialisation which, in Bristol at least, started making itself apparent around the beginning of September.  And, irreligious as I am, I do feel sorrow for those for whom Christmas has a religious significance: it must be very grim and disheartening to see it so swamped by the various non-spiritual behemoths.

The first image in the Outer Suburbs series, with context, is here: 1 .  Subsequent images are here: 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40 41 42 .  Each will open in a separate window.

Click twice onto the images to enlarge them in separate windows.

Technique: TG-5; Lightroom; south Bristol; 1 Dec 2018.
.
.
.

%d bloggers like this: