OUTER SUBURBS 149 – SUNRISE, WITH WOODEN FENCE AND THE SHADOWS OF BRAMBLES

 

 


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Walking down a narrow lane in a housing estate, the newly risen sun blazing behind me, and on my right a new wooden fence, caught in the fierce glare and dappled with the shadows of brambles.

Click onto the image to open a larger version in a separate window, and click onto that image to further enlarge it.

Technique: TG-5 at 53mm (equiv); 800 ISO; Lightroom, starting at the Camera Natural profile; south Bristol; 2 Oct 2019.

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SOMERSET LEVELS 402 – THORNS, WEBS, MORNING DEW

 

 


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Bramble, festooned with wet cobwebs in the early morning dew.  It was 0635, and I’d just arrived in Swanshard Lane after a fast drive down largely empty main roads from Bristol.  There is a little, rough layby in this winding, single track lane, where I often pull over, to walk about and take in the place >>> and to try to keep on keeping on by swigging hot sweet coffee!!!

The hedge on the other side of the lane had various plants standing up against a distant backdrop and, used close in, the long end of the telezoom defocused that backdrop completely.

Click onto the image to open a larger version in a separate window, and click onto that image to further enlarge it – recommended.

Technique: Z 6 with 70-300 Nikkor lens at 300mm; 3200 ISO; Lightroom, starting at the Camera Portrait v2 profile; Swanshard Lane, on the Somerset Levels southwest of Wells; 23 Aug 2019.
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GARDEN 65 – BRAMBLE (MONO)

 

 

bramble-mono
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Bramble in our Bristol garden; 8 Aug 2015.

The tip of one of this invasive plant’s exploring branches, swaying innocently just above our lawn –  soft little leaves and each longing with all its heart (if leaves have hearts)  to inch further down, touch the ground and firmly take root.  In the warmer months, patrols with a stout pair of garden shears are the order of the day!

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D700 with 105mm Nikkor; 1000 ISO; Silver Efex Pro 2, starting at the Fine Art High Key preset and adding a split tone.
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GARDEN 64 – DEAD LEAF, SUNSTRUCK

 

 

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Dead leaf – sunstruck – in our garden; 8 Aug 2015.

Death in a garden, made bright by the rising of our star.  A last remnant, holding on, still beautiful, defying Earth’s incessant pull.

And I killed it.  Why?  Well, that’s a sharp thorn on the stem just below the leaf –  this a the branch of a bramble.  And were I not to keep these barbed bushes in check, our garden would soon be overwhelmed and impenetrable, to us at least.

And do we – “us” – merit this slaughter, or should we just let Nature takes it course?  This is a question that I sometimes wonder about.

Click onto the image to see a larger version in a separate window.

D700 with 105mm Nikkor; 400 ISO.
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MENDIP HILLS 33 – BRAMBLE AND HAWTHORN (MONO)

 

 

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Bramble and Hawthorn along the side of East Water Lane; 7 Aug 2014.

The sharp thorns and rounded, serrated leaves of Bramble, the plant that rends clothes and skin and swamps your garden if you give it half a chance – but which is redeemed by being the source at this time of the year of gorgeous blackberries. 

And below, the smaller, notched leaves of Hawthorn, also known as May because it blossoms – and gorgeously too – during that month.  My mother was born in May, and was given that as her middle name.   And there are many red berries on these trees now, but whether that indicates a mild or a hard winter – who knows?

D800 with 70-300 Nikkor at 300mm; 800 ISO; Silver Efex Pro 2, starting at the Negative preset; further processing in Capture NX2.
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GARDEN 49 – EARLY MORNING GARDEN: BRAMBLE (MONO + COLOUR)

 

 

A Bramble shoot arcing up into the air
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A shoot from one of the dense Bramble thickets bordering our “lawns”, arcing up into the air with the hope of eventually landing on open ground and thus extending the thicket’s size; 10 July 2014.

I’m decidedly ambivalent about Brambles.  Their plus side of course is their copious fruit, the blackberry, which stains fingers, tastes delicious and takes part in all sorts of delicious other foods – jam, jelly, pies, crumbles – and the latter two with lashings of glorious custard!  And all of this, especially for a FATman, must outweigh all the negatives but, outweighed as they may be, they cannot be ignored.

First, Brambles are covered in sharp thorns, which snag clothing and easily pierce skin  – this is not a plant to be tackled with even gloved hands. 

And second, these plants are territorially voracious, and this is what is shown above.  For thickets send these exploratory branches skywards and, after climbing, they arch over towards the ground – and when they eventually land on the open ground around the thicket, they take root and so expand the thicket’s size – after which the whole process repeats itself.  A few years unguarded – by me and my pair of B&Q Value shears! –  or certainly a decade, and our garden would be completely engulfed.

This shot was originally a near silhouette of the plant against a blue sky.  Taking the image into black and white, I converted the sky to plain white, and then restored, and lightened, almost all of the plant’s colours.  A thin border serves to show the subject’s position within the frame.

D800 with 50mm Nikkor used in DX format to provide 75mm; 400 ISO; Silver Efex Pro 2, starting at the High Key 2  preset and selectively restoring colour.
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