ARCHIVE 596 – QUEEN CHARLOTTE STREET (MONO)

 

 


.

Morning sunlight across a rough façade.  I’m down an alleyway in the city centre and the décor is, shall we say, functional.  Lots of rough texture, no need for the expense of glamorous, smooth surfaces here.  And off the main road a little, out of view a bit, so plain bars to deter those who, seized by an excess of entrepreneurial zeal, might not want to enter through the front door.

Click onto the image to open a larger version in a separate window – recommended.

Technique: X-T2 with 55-200 Fujinon lens at 145mm (equiv); 800 ISO; Lightroom; Silver Efex Pro 2, starting at the Architectural preset; Queen Charlotte Street, central Bristol; 8 July 2017.

.
.
.

OUTER SUBURBS 302 – DAWN

 

 


.
As Dylan Thomas (certainly inspirational, certainly a hero) put it: the dawn inches up …

Click onto the “early morning” tag (below) to see more images from the early hours of the day. 

Click onto the image to open a larger version in a separate window – recommended.

Technique: TG-5 at 100mm (equiv); 800 ISO; spot metering; Lightroom, starting at the Camera Portrait profile; south Bristol; 8 Dec 2020.
.
.
.

OUTER SUBURBS 301 – BUS SHELTER 2

 

 


.
HAPPY NEW YEAR!  🍺

There is another recent bus shelter photo here .

Click onto the image to open a larger version in a separate window – recommended.

Technique: TG-5 at 25mm (equiv); 1600 ISO; Lightroom, starting at the Camera Vivid profile; south Bristol; 6 Dec 2020.
.
.
.

ARCHIVE 592 – LOOKING INTO AN EMPTY BUILDING

 

 

.>
.

The FATman has you in his (actually rather wonderful) electronic viewfinder!

Or, then again, I’m pointing my camera into an empty building.  There’s really not much here.  My (double) reflection is given substance by a dark pillar in the building’s interior, and the rest of the picture shows a desolate and completely empty room – left by a business that has moved on –  with a large window on the left through which a building in the next street can be faintly be seen.

Click onto the image to open a larger version in a separate window.

Technique: X-T2 with 55-200 Fujinon lens at 300mm (equiv); 1600 ISO; Lightroom, using the Classic Chrome film simulation; Quay Street, central Bristol; 20 Apr 2018.

.
.
.

OUTER SUBURBS AT 300

 

 

Walking the roads at night’s end
.

I started the Outer Suburbs posts on 25 Aug 2018, carrying the little Olympus Tough TG-5 camera in my pocket on the long, early morning walks (LOL! >>> maybe I should say route marches!) that I take around Bristol’s outer limits, in vain pursuit of a slimmer waistline.  In that first post over two years ago, I said that I had no idea of how the series might progress – and with hindsight I certainly had no idea of how a disease emanating from a “wet” market on the other side of the world was going to affect my life and the lives of vast numbers of other people across the world, and end so many peoples’ lives too.

But solitary, early morning walks have proved a good way of getting the exercise that brings real mental and physical benefits in this strange, new reality – while keeping away from the crowded and indoor spaces where the virus continues to thrive.  This series of posts has photographed many things, and I’m rather taken aback to have reached number 300.  Via the vaccines, there is the possibility of some light at the end of the tunnel now, although I harbour absolutely no illusions about a speedy return to normality.  It is simply a case of keeping well informed about what is going on with the virus, taking all the precautions, and seeing what materialises.

Below are some earlier pictures from the series.  Clicking onto any of the images here will open a larger version in a separate window – recommended.

Take care – and stay safe – everyone!

.

Early morning 6

.

Car beside fence, early light

.


A good plateful

.

Early morning mist, main road

.

Autumn

.

Bus shelter, early morning light

.

Early morning 41

.

Modern life 8

.

Path through modern housing 4

.

Soda water with ice and a slice of lemon 3

.

Symbols of division and the shadow of a car

.

Photographing a tree’s shadow on the wall of a house, at sunrise

.

.

.

OUTER SUBURBS 299 – BUS SHELTER

 

 


.
Bus shelter, dawn breaking.

Click onto the “early morning” tag (below) to see more images from the early hours of the day. 

Click onto the image to open a larger version in a separate window – recommended.

Technique: TG-5 at 25mm (equiv); 3200 ISO; Lightroom, starting at the Camera Vivid profile; south Bristol; 15 Dec 2020.
.
.
.

ARCHIVE: LOOKING AT CARS 32 – CAR PARK (MONO + COLOUR)

 

 


.

Looking up at Trenchard Street Car Park in central Bristol; 16 Sept 2016.

Tilted (at capture) to produce a strong diagonal, a dynamic that I prefer to leaving things staidly horizontal.  Then processed to give an almost pure black and white look – black and white,  two blank tones that reveal no detail.   While keeping in mind that, viewed against the pure white background of my blog, the white areas would show no border to the image, so that the image can be viewed as four separate images, juxtaposed.  Restoration of the rear lights’ colour provides two small focal points.

I suppose that what I’m aiming at, what I like to think, is that such an image becomes less a representation of reality, and more a piece of design.  Such an attitude may seem pretentious, but it does represent to some extent “where I am” with regard to images.

The Looking at Cars series: looking back through the nine years of the FATman Photos archives (and some new images too), I’m posting pictures of cars in various contexts and styles.  Earlier Looking at Cars posts are here: 1 (with context); 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 .  Each post will open in a separate window.

Click onto the image to open a larger version in a separate window – recommended.

Technique: X-T1 with 55-200 Fujinon lens at 300mm (equiv); 400 ISO; Silver Efex Pro 2, including selective restoration of colour.

.
.
.

OUTER SUBURBS 290 – ALLEYWAY

 

 


.
Suburban alleyway, viewed with a wide angle lens.  The streetlight is still bright, its just after dawn, and the dark fences on either side draw me in – “down” might say it better – towards the distance’s faint, misty uncertainties.

Click onto the “early morning” tag (below) to see more images from the early hours of the day. 

Click onto the image to open a larger version in a separate window – definitely recommended.

Technique: TG-5 at 25mm (equiv); 1600 ISO; spot metering; Lightroom, starting at the Camera Portrait profile; south Bristol; 6 Nov 2020.
.
.
.

ARCHIVE 582 – BALUSTRADE, BACKLIT

 

 


.

Backlit plaster balustrade in a restaurant; Newquay, Cornwall; 13 Sept 2011.

We were having lunch – my snout was squarely in the trough –  when a burst of sunlight opened up this scene right beside our table.  The long end of a short zoom was just enough to capture these repeating patterns, fading off into a distance which is actually only a few feet away, beside the next table in the room. 

Altering the orientation of the image gives the impression of lighting pouring up from below.  The colours are minimal, but they certainly give this shot an edge over monochrome versions.

Click onto the image to open a larger version in a separate window – recommended.

Technique: D700 with 24-120 Nikkor lens at 120mm; 1600 ISO; image horizontally flipped and then rotated 90 degrees clockwise.

UPDATE: looking at this anew, after nine years, I’m struck by those long dark curves coming in from the left.  They rise very gently – less is more! – as they move across the frame, after which they peak, falter – and descend abruptly into the image’s far more active right third.

.
.
.

ARCHIVE 580 – THE CHAPTER HOUSE STEPS (MONO)

 

 


.

The Chapter House Steps in Wells Cathedral, Somerset; 7 Jan 2005.

I have to hold my hand up here and at once acknowledge that this photo has already been taken by hundreds of other photographers – just search for these steps on Google if you don’t believe me; an early (perhaps the first?) photo of these stairs was taken in 1900, by Frederick Henry Evans.

Near the top right of this photo, the steps can be seen turning right into the Chapter House. Straight ahead, through the illuminated doorway, is the bridge that allowed the clergy to come directly into the cathedral from their lodgings, rather than having to be exposed to worldly temptations by mixing with the townspeople.

See how the edges of the steps have been worn down by the tramp of countless feet over the centuries.

Click onto the image to open a larger version in a separate window – recommended.

Technique: tripod-mounted OM-4 with 21mm Zuiko lens; Agfa Scala monochrome slide film, rated at 400 ISO.

March 2015 update: three things come to mind.  First, I like this image but don’t really think its “my kind of picture”.  Yes, its a beautiful and historic place, the image has nice tones and there are the worn steps to emphasise just how old this place is.  But, that said, its still just a record of an architectural interior, and I’m not sure that shakes my tree.

Second, it was taken on a now discontinued film that I used to regard as being one of the greatest casualties of the Digital Revolution – it started life as an Agfa Scala black and white slide.  Nearly all of my photography in those days used colour slides (aka transparencies), which I used to give slideshows on a Leica projector – and it was so good to be able to include mono shots along with the far more ubiquitous colour.  And Scala was a rough and tough film – rated at 400 ISO, it could be push processed to 1600 or 3200 ISO – and I was in my dark and moody, monochrome element!

However, I used to regard this wonderful film as a great loss – but now find that scanned versions offer far less potential for digital manipulation than full colour, raw files.  Most digital cameras can of course capture black and white images straight off but, particularly if substantial post-capture editing is anticipated – as it is in all of my mono photography – then shooting in full colour raw and then converting to mono is the way to go.

And, lastly, today is a minor anniversary, because this picture was taken with an Olympus OM-4 film SLR that I bought second hand on this day 12 years ago, as a means of getting back into photography once more.  Olympus OM film cameras and lenses were absolutely something else – light, compact and with excellent mechanical and optical quality.  I shot film, mostly as slides (transparencies), which was a great discipline – but in 2009 very abruptly changed to digital – since when I have never shot another frame of film.  The advent of digital photography has certainly been the single most important event in my “photographic life”, because it provides such vast scope for creativity.

.
.
.

%d bloggers like this: