BIRDS 131 – GREAT WHITE EGRET

 

 


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Great White Egret, a member of the heron family, on the edge of a reed bed in Herons Green Bay, at Chew Valley Lake, a reservoir just south of Bristol.  Two things make this photo rather special to me.  First, this was one of the places where two school friends whom I am still in touch with – one in The States, the other in Australia – got me into birding in 1967.  Herons Green Bay looks much the same as it did all those years ago, and its good to go back there now (less than half and hour’s drive away) and see this part of my birding roots more or less as they were.

The other thing is that the presence of this bird shows just how things can change because, back in the 1960s, this was a very rare bird in the UK, whereas now small numbers breed in the UK and there are usually a few individuals  at Chew Lake.  I imagine this is somehow related to climate change.

Click onto the image to open a larger version in a separate window.

Technique: Z 6 with 70-300 Nikkor lens used in DX (= APS-C) format to give 450mm; 1600 ISO; Lightroom, starting at the Camera Portrait v2 profile; Chew Valley Lake, Somerset; 7 Dec 2020.
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About Adrian Lewis
Photographer - using mono, colour and combinations of the two - many types of subject, including Minimalism, landscapes, abstracts, soft colour, people, movement, nature - I like to be adventurous, trying new ideas, working in multiple genres. And I've a weakness for Full English Breakfasts and Duvel golden ale, though not necessarily together.

22 Responses to BIRDS 131 – GREAT WHITE EGRET

  1. Lovely capture, Adrian!

    Liked by 1 person

  2. Stella says:

    Beautiful shot! There are a pair (at least) living round here, and they have frustrated my attempts to get a shot all year. Their last stunt was to fly about three feet over my head in formation while I was out running and thus didn’t have a camera of any kind to hand!

    Like

    • Adrian Lewis says:

      Thank you! Birds and cameras are often a difficult / inconvenient mix. Bird photography is a whole tougher discipline than birdwatching, and I stuck to the latter; my bird pics are pure opportunism, often, as here, with a long telephoto.

      Liked by 2 people

  3. I like this photograph a lot, Adrian—the subject, the reflection in the water, the tall grasses that create an attractive backdrop for the bird, the muted colors . . .

    Like

    • Adrian Lewis says:

      Thank you, Linda. I’m pleased with it too, the more I looked at it, the more it grew on me, particularly in terms of its simplicity. In a way, I suppose, its getting over towards the Minimal, both in terms of colours and content. Thank you again. 🙂

      Liked by 2 people

  4. bluebrightly says:

    They’re such beauties, and this photograph shows the excitement one gets when one sees a Great egret peering from behind the grasses. I was introduced to them when our family spent Easters on coastal Georgia, far south of where we lived. Then, just as in your experience, they were fairly uncommon outside of Florida but now they’re reliably found around NYC. I’m really glad this birding roots spot is still protected!

    Like

  5. Meanderer says:

    Very beautiful image, my friend. Your words struck me, as has Gary’s comment, where I was going to type the same thing. In a way, you are both in good places: Gary ‘cos, well, New Zealand, innit, and yourself being close to your roots feels like an important and ‘right’ kind of place to be right now. I guess if one is going to feel melancholy, then mid-December is probably the time for it 🙂

    Like

    • Adrian Lewis says:

      Well, quite apart from the pandemic, many people are effected by the darker months of the year. LOL! I’ll never forget finally getting back to the UK from blazing equatorial sunshine, in Nov I think it was, 1989, and being appalled to see the the sun just creeping up over the horizon each day.

      But I’ve grown to appreciate the days of gloom and the darkness, and photography may well have lent a substantial helping hand with this – eg I don’t see gloomy landscapes / street scenes as such, but rather as objects of great and absorbing visual beauty, which I greatly enjoy photographing. 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

  6. Cool photo. Cool story. Warm memory. 🥰

    Like

  7. Nice shot with some lovely colours.
    I was tempted to make light with a pun or two with something like: ‘Je ne egret rien’ or ‘Egrets, I’ve had a few but then again two few to mention’… But decided against it 😉
    Have a great day

    Liked by 2 people

  8. krikitarts says:

    How valuable it is to be go back to the the scenes where some of our roots began to grow. You’re fortunate to have some of these still close at hand. Very few are available to me any more, and it’s a melancholy feeling.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Adrian Lewis says:

      I very much understand what you’re saying, Gary, and I agree. I suppose I’ve come full circle, having traveled / lived here and there, and now I’m back a short drive from this “place from long ago”, and only about 20 miles from where I grew up. I’m happy to be back where I started, and really feel very little need to go anywhere else: its part of wanting a simple life, I guess.

      I can understand your melancholy, my friend, though just at the moment you’re far better off where you are. Maybe if all of this lessens, you’ll be able to get back there for visits. I very much hope so. Meanwhile, stay safe! 🙂

      Like

    • Meanderer says:

      I was about to write something similar. Don’t know if it’s the time of year, the dark rainy days, or the feeling of being trapped here during the current lockdown, away from family and friends and from roots, but the feeling of melancholia is deep and heavy ……

      Liked by 1 person

  9. Such a beautiful photo… looks like he or she is thinking about life itself.

    Like

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