PEOPLE 388 – GOING TO WORK 100: SOME PICTURES FROM EARLIER POSTS

 

 

1: the morning bus.

Well, Going to Work – images from Bristol’s morning rush hour – has reached 100 posts, and I’m both pleased and surprised.  As is usual with my photo series, I haven’t the faintest idea of how – or indeed, if – it will progress but, that’s me!  I started the series back in July 2016, and have more and more been drawn towards photographing in the dark, cold, early mornings of winter, but so far this winter I have only managed one such sortie.  Increasing years perhaps, or changing photographic attitudes / preferences / energies?  Early morning buses down to the city centre are still readily available, but these days the vast majority of my early morning forays are local and on foot – and are recorded in this blog’s Outer Suburbs series, which includes the Early Morning series, and which is steadily moving towards 200 posts.

So, anyway, Going to Work at 100, what are my thoughts? Well, on the technical side, I’m grateful for having cameras and image processing software that enable me to photograph in such challenging, early morning conditions.  And then, second – and especially since retirement has given me the space to look at and think about the world around me more – I continue to think about the dehumanisation that modern workstyles can bring – of which work-related stress (which I fell prone to, twice) is a sure pointer.  And especially with regard to working in cities and other large conurbations, with commuting long distances to work, with feeling the need to look at work emails and mobile texts outside of working hours >>> and to balancing all in the “busy modern lifestyle”.

So here are images illustrating just one of these phenomena: the morning rush hour, the morning rush to work, which most people engage in five days out of every seven. Links to the whole series, should you wish to look through them, are given below.  I hope you will like these pictures – clicking onto them once or twice will enlarge them in separate windows.

.
2: the first post, 23 July 2016; the birth of an idea.

.
3: the morning bus, overcrowded, overheated, steamy.

.

Recent Going to Work posts are here: 93 94 95 96 97 98 99 .  Each will open in a separate window.

GOING TO WORK: THE EARLIER POSTS: 1-92.

You can see a summary of the Going to Work series here .

Earlier images from this series can be found here: 1, 2, 3, 45, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 1213, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 2324, 25, 26, 27, 28,  29, 30,  31,  32, 33  34  35  36 37  38 39 40 41 42 43 44 45  46 47 48 49 50 51 52 53 54 55 56 57 58 59 60 61 62 63 64 65 66 67 68 69 70 71 72 73 74 75 76 77 78 79 80 81 82 83 84 85 86 87 88 89 90 91 92 Each will open in a separate window.

.

4: that expression; we’ve all been there.

.
5: hurrying to work, hurrying through the cold, hurrying towards the unreachable light.

.

6: a rather scary part of walking and photographing the morning rush hour is the frenetic and often careless driving of those apparently thinking of little else besides getting to work on time.  When I compiled this post, a week or so back, I wrote “I’ve seen numerous near misses, i.e. near collisions, between vehicles …”.  Well that has changed now: around dawn on Wednesday, on a well lit main road, a car pulled out into the traffic and their came the dull thud and flying debris of an impact; fortunately both drivers were only shaken up.

And I’ve avoided being hit more times than I like to think about >>> and this includes numerous occasions when people reversing out of their driveways fail to ensure that no one is behind them on the pavement!  I particularly remember a woman rushing out of her front door, slamming it, jumping into her big BMW, switching on the ignition, revving up and lurching forward a foot or so before realising that I was a couple of feet from her front bumper: I’ll never forget the totally bewildered and stunned look on her face.  Do I have great admiration for all members the species to which I belong?  Well that’s a very iffy and loaded question, I mean, you’re putting me on the spot here …
.

7: waiting for the morning bus
.
8: lurching forward out of the early morning gloom with a damned big camera, I can have this effect on people.

.

9: going to work from way out in the Outer Suburbs – standing in a bus shelter illuminated by the rising sun and surrounded by fields and trees, but entranced only by mobile phones; a lucky, opportunistic capture with the TG-5.

.

10: I’ve seen this so often – they’re looking down and preoccupied – they’re going to work.

.
11: my overall favourite, I suppose; such an interesting and arresting character >>> I’d love to connect!

.
12: another cold sunrise.

.
13: on her radar.

.
14: another favourite; short of time and the traffic banked up ahead – once again, we’ve all been there; I also like the light on the car’s dirty and “distressed” (but, to me, eminently characterful) bodywork.

.
15: reality; this is how it can be sometimes.

.
16: perhaps dozing, perhaps temporarily somewhere else.

.
17: breakfast, on the go >>> oh, and – of course – role model!!!

.

18: reading the morning paper; the couple behind gazing forwards, as if with foreboding.

.

19: again, that look.

.

20: “Who’s the fat geezer with the camera?”.

.
.
.

About Adrian Lewis
Photographer working in monochrome, colour and combinations of the two - with a great liking for many types of subject, including Minimalism, landscapes, abstracts, soft colour, people, movement, nature - I like to be adventurous in my photography, trying new ideas and working in many genres. And I'm fond of Full English Breakfasts and Duvel golden ale, though not necessarily together.

35 Responses to PEOPLE 388 – GOING TO WORK 100: SOME PICTURES FROM EARLIER POSTS

  1. msnyder1970 says:

    How close are you to your subjects ? That to me is always the challenge with street photography. I don’t want to invade anyone’s personal space. Sometimes at least for me is to take unassuming photos shot from the hip, because then people are less inclined to think you are taking a photo specifically of them. But I like lights and textures more than people for photographing. I must say though, everyone in this series looks pissed off.

    Like

    • Adrian Lewis says:

      I’m not a street photographer, Matt, far from it, but, now being retired, I do have an interest in the dehumanising / alienating effect work can have on people, and so to this series. These pictures were nearly all taken with a 70-300 telezoom on full-frame cameras, so I was usually some distance from the subjects – and most of the comments I received were apologies for getting in the way of my shots! Yes, everyone is pissed off / preoccupied – this is how they look on their way into work; this can be seen whether a camera is present or not; its very striking. A 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

  2. Sonali Dalal says:

    wow!wow! wow! just love it!!!!! it deserves many exclamation marks.

    Like

  3. bluebrightly says:

    It is such a terrific series, Adrian, and it’s nice to see this selection. Your thoughts about stress and work – I too was thinking about that a lot towards the end of my working days, and have been since retiring. The daily grind is so destructive, so anti-quality of life, but people get caught up in it and can’t see it for what it is. Over here, more and more people are NOT commuting but are working part-time or from home. That helps a little, but then home/work boundaries are muddled, which is really bad. And part-time pays badly.
    It’s a good thing – a damn good thing – that you avoided being sandwiched in that collision you saw.
    There are so many wonderful shots here that I cannot pick out a few. But maybe you’ve inspired me to do something similar – shy not? It’s instructive to put together a group of one’s images. You learn something. So thank you and enjoy the rest of your week! the 31st is almost here, wow, Brexit there you go!

    Like

    • Adrian Lewis says:

      Lynn, thank you for your good thoughts, I’m very glad you like the pictures >>> yes, do it, do a review of some of your earlier images – maybe a particular genre or place perhaps???

      Many people work from home here too now but, as you say, it blurs the work-home life boundaries and, on the few times I did it, I found it quite unsettling.

      Seeing the cars crash shook me up: I continue to be super, super careful on my early walks.

      And, finally, Brexit. I’ve been a supporter since day one, and I do have confidence in Boris Johnson as I think he has the right ideals, and in him I see someone who gets things done. There us the temptation to compare him with Trump, but I think that Trump is really down at the bottom of things, in a class of his own; and a far, far less competent operator and deep thinker than Boris. Brexit is such a pity though, since if the EU had stayed as a loose groups of states, cooperating on defence and trade, all would have been fine – but there was the push to create a “United States of Europe”, and so Brexit occurred. A 🙂

      Like

  4. I love this series, Adrian. Glad you have more photos to add to it.

    Like

  5. It is such a rich seam of image making that you have tapped into. I have to admit I am generally not a fan of street photography probably because much of what is published online is uninspired and creatively casual (Is that an expression?). Your images on the other hand are well executed and inspiring. I’m sure you’ll remember from my earlier comments in this series that I think what you with these shots is brilliant and captured and composed with a great deal of skill and creativity. There is a commentary that runs through the series but the pictures do all the talking.
    When I see these photographs I often think they would make a great exhibition where people can have real conversations about the photographs and how they see them. I suspect your images are a great catalyst to interesting conversations.
    If not an exhibition have you ever thought of doing a book with these images (or maybe a book and an exhibition!). Every year I make myself an annual hard back photo book using my favourite images from that year. It’s nice to share my photographs with people in a physical form rather than on a screen and a photo book is also a nice thing to keep. Many of our images end up sat on a hard drive somewhere and often never to be seen again!
    I use a book company where it is possible for people to purchase copies if I should choose to sell them – although as yet I haven’t sold any books and they are not available to the general public but have had some printed and given them away. The point here is that if you used a similar or same company to create a book then it would be possible for people to purchase your work in this form. It’s print on demand so there aren’t the overheads of buying dozens of copies and you set the price.
    Keep up the good (going to) work…
    Best wishes
    Mr C 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

    • Adrian Lewis says:

      Well, Mr C, thank you very much indeed! I’m very glad that you like these photos.

      I’ve never had an exhibition of any my pictures >>> and, being quite honest, I’m probably far too lazy to organise one!!!

      But I used to do the same as you, compiling an annual Blurb photobook of my favourite images, and also compiling other such books for gifts including birthday presents – many of these were tailored specifically for the recipients, which made them very personal items, and they went down well. But I haven’t made any such books for the last year or so – maybe getting even lazier, or maybe age is getting to me. But I did give a Going to Work photobook to a close friend who, as a psychologist, was especially interested.

      Thank you again for your very encouraging words. Adrian 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

      • I’m not one for exhibitions but I think your going to work series is a body of work that can stir important conversations as well as inspire people photographically🙂 However I fully understand the amount of work required and cost and you already share your work through your blog – which we all appreciate👍
        Blurb is the place I go to for my books. Their software seems to allow most customisation and the quality is good. You probably know that Blurb regularly offer discounts but my top tip (should you decide to make another) is that over the last few years the maximum 50% discount regularly pops up in November around Black Friday😉
        Best wishes
        Mr C

        Like

  6. Such a bold series. So many over-looked aspects of our daily doing. I do hope you keep it up.
    “Do I have great admiration for all members the species to which I belong?”
    I have been in the restaurant/food-service industry for going on 35 years. My admiration reservoir is close to bone dry. Which is why I am looking for a job/career where I can see people at their best, instead of their worst. Life is too short for impatience!

    Like

    • Adrian Lewis says:

      Johnny, thank you very much indeed for your very encouraging words! I do have some more Work pictures to post and will post them, but (as is usual with me!) I have no idea where this series will go in the future.

      Getting to more fundamental things, I very much like ” Life is too short for impatience!”. For me Life is too short for many things; modern living seems to be becoming increasingly complex, and I simply can’t be bothered with a lot of the complexity >>> LOL! for a start, my mobile phone is not the centre of my life, it is simply something that comes in useful now and then; neither am I totally in the thrall of money/profit as many people seem to be. Perhaps all my life, but especially now that I’m retired, I’m attempting to pursue the simple life, which is something that really works for me. ” Life is too short for impatience!” sounds very much like its along those lines! Adrian 🙂

      Like

  7. Meanderer says:

    I’ve very much enjoyed your Going to Work series. I like the way they aren’t posed and so show humans on their way to work in all their glory 🙂 The sad looks on some of the faces really get to me – I must have looked that way whilst on the journey to some jobs I’ve had.

    I like the images with the rising golden sun which backlights? some of the people and those condensation-filled bus window scenes. I like all of these but your choice of final picture is really quite lovely – her expression – one of resignation, amusement, bewilderment, acceptance …….. it’s all there!

    Like

    • Adrian Lewis says:

      M, my friend, thank you very much! I have some more pictures to add to this series, but am not sure I have the energy for lot more early city visits now – but who knows?

      The Fat Geezer with the Camera 🙂 🙂 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

  8. A remarkable series, Adrian. Congratulations!

    Like

  9. StillWalks says:

    I love these photos and have always looked forward to seeing your latest on this theme 😊 It’s great to see them together.

    Like

  10. oneowner says:

    I can appreciate these shots on an artistic level. The problem I have (and I admit it’s my problem) is that I feel like I’m intruding on other people who may be oblivious to the camera and I don’t know if I could ask anyone to sign a release. My basic shyness prohibits me from showing a candid photo to a stranger and ask if they would mind if I published it. News organizations do it all the time without asking but I don’t know if everyday events are considered news. All that being said, your photos are very well done and I do like them. I’d be interested to know if you engage with any of the subjects.

    Like

    • Adrian Lewis says:

      These are good points, Ken. In the UK, except in very specialised circumstances, its legal to take pictures of any subject in public places; no release is needed unless the resulting pictures are going to be sold, which my pictures never are. I have tried engaging with subjects prior to taking their pictures but the resulting images have always appeared posed, whereas these candids reflect real life. Its true that I have received one or two irritated looks, but it really is one or two, and those occurrences have certainly been outnumbered by those instances where people have apologised for getting in the way of my shots. I am no psychologist, but I know that I am not the only one to have noticed how oblivious people on their way to work are of their surroundings – and as mentioned above this “fixation” with getting into work can extend to their driving habits too. Adrian

      Liked by 1 person

    • Adrian Lewis says:

      Having replied to you yesterday, Ken, it occurred to me that I’d omitted something. A few times, people have asked what I’m doing when taking such photos, and on these occasions I explain fully, and (although FATman Photos is not a business), I give them one of my blog’s business cards, which includes my email address. These explanations have never stimulated anything but interest. A

      Like

  11. robert20359 says:

    hi adrian a great selection and retrospective of your pictures for your project.
    I particularly like the first and ninth. greetings robert

    Like

  12. Janet says:

    These are all amazing!

    Like

  13. These are all very compelling captures.

    Liked by 1 person

  14. 100! Congratz! A great series. Cheers!

    Like

This blog has two pleasures for me - creating the images and hearing from you - so get your thoughts out to the world!

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

%d bloggers like this: