SOMERSET LEVELS 417 – WILLOW 4 (MONO)

 

 


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These images are certainly best viewed enlarged – click onto each of them to open a larger version in a separate window and click onto that image to further enlarge it – recommended.

Pollarded willow, old and leaning precariously, beside the River Sheppey in Swanshard Lane.  These are mono versions of a previously posted colour image – see 3 below.

Technique:  these images, both captured by the Nikon Z 6, have been created in two different ways.  The one above was produced by in-camera processing of a raw file, using the camera’s Graphite picture control, and no further processing in Lightroom.  The one below was via the “traditional route”, i.e. via Lightroom and Silver Efex Pro 2,  using the latter’s Landscape preset.   They’re similar, but I have to say – purely subjectively of course – that I prefer the in-camera processing.  My reasons?  Well I think that the lower one is a bit too grey, with too many of the leaves visible; whereas the upper one has more of the leaves and branches burnt out, so focusing more attention on the gnarled trunk.  Which, if any, do you prefer???
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There are other Willow portraits here: 1 2 3 .

There is more about the ancient practice of pollarding here .

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About Adrian Lewis
Photographer working in monochrome, colour and combinations of the two - with a great liking for many types of subject, including Minimalism, landscapes, abstracts, soft colour, people, movement, nature - I like to be adventurous in my photography, trying new ideas and working in many genres. And I'm fond of Full English Breakfasts and Duvel golden ale, though not necessarily together.

8 Responses to SOMERSET LEVELS 417 – WILLOW 4 (MONO)

  1. bluebrightly says:

    The “Graphite” filter is well named, and could put an illustrator out of business, used in the right hands. As it was here. It’s beautiful. For me, both images have their pluses but I would probably also choose the first if I was forced to pick one.

    Like

    • Adrian Lewis says:

      Hahaha! >>> no force involved or applied!!! Yes, I’m very impressed with Graphite – it is of course possible to over use an effect (eg fisheye lenses) but, for the moment at least, I keep being impressed by its results. Thank you for your good thoughts, Lynn. A 🙂

      Like

  2. Mathias LK says:

    Agree, the top one stands out a bit stronger; as a single image out of context I would choose that one. In a documentary series context; perhaps the second.

    Liked by 1 person

  3. oneowner says:

    I like the in-camera processed version better. However, I think that a similar (if not exact version of it could be produced in LR using a variety of methods, both automatically and traditionally (dodging, burning, curve adjustment, etc). Granted, this takes a certain skill level and is more time-consuming but for an old darkroom tec like me – that’s where a lot of the fun of photography is.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Adrian Lewis says:

      Oh I’m certainly not suggesting that the effects achieved in-camera raw processing cannot be achieved elsewhere, Ken, but I am interested in its creative potential and, in particular, I like the Graphite picture control that the Nikon Z 6 offers.

      I’ve used wet darkrooms too, at school and university, but have to say that my skills were at very best basic! Later I specialised in colour slides, and giving shows and presentations (I’ve worked as a university lecturer, and so presentations were second nature). Now I’m absolutely taken up with the creative possibilities digital provides – and I enjoy writing on my blog too. A 🙂

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  4. Meanderer says:

    Ooh, it’s been horrible to choose one of these! It’s best, I think, not to over-think it and go on feeling. I’ve chosen the first image; it’s enlivening 🙂

    Like

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