BRISTOL 150 – PARKED CAR 4: STRIP OF REFLECTED LIGHT ON A CAR DOOR (MONO)

 

 


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Early morning, low angle sunshine beside the railway station, and the door of a parked car is hit by a stray beam of bright reflected light.

A Minimalist image, presented in black and white to make it more so.  There’s really very little to see here – just the door handle and the narrow gap between the door and the rest of the car’s bodywork, both rendered in sharp focus; and, at bottom left, the lower edge of the door and the shadowed road below it.  And, finally, the bright band of reflected light, presumably coming from a nearby sunlit window pane.

This is the camera catching and preserving a tiny part of a much larger scene during a brief moment in time.  In itself, the scene is insignificant but, as always, it is good to see it, it is good to look at our surroundings, rather than just casually glancing over them while thinking of other – possibly equally trivial – things.  It is always good to engage with Reality, even mundane Reality, in this way >>> and the more so if you have an interest in the visual world.

There are earlier images in this Parked Car series here: 1 2 3 .

Click onto the image to open a larger version in a separate window, and click onto that image to enlarge it further.

Technique: Z 6 with 70-300 Nikkor lens at 300mm; 1600 ISO; Lightroom, starting at the Camera Graphite profile; flipped; beside Temple Meads railway station, in central Bristol; 10 May 2019.
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About Adrian Lewis
Photographer working in monochrome, colour and combinations of the two - with a great liking for many types of subject, including Minimalism, landscapes, abstracts, soft colour, people, movement, nature - I like to be adventurous in my photography, trying new ideas and working in many genres. And I'm fond of Full English Breakfasts and Duvel golden ale, though not necessarily together.

12 Responses to BRISTOL 150 – PARKED CAR 4: STRIP OF REFLECTED LIGHT ON A CAR DOOR (MONO)

  1. Meanderer says:

    Finding the beauty and interest in everyday objects and scenes is a grand thing to do, my friend. I shall think about and do that today.

    Like

  2. Adrian, I love love love what you say here: “. . . always good to engage with Reality, even mundane Reality, in this way >>> and the more so if you have an interest in the visual world.” These are my sentiments absolutely exactly. (Nice photo, too.)

    Like

  3. Fine Minimal! I like the depth of field you used here. Adios!

    Like

  4. oneowner says:

    I don;t know the meaning of “mundane” and I don’t want to know. I like this image, A.

    Like

  5. It takes a keen eye to find beauty in the little, almost mundane things. Nice work.

    Like

  6. Minimalism requires an eye for detail and nuance, which you obviously have. Very nice.

    Like

    • Adrian Lewis says:

      I suppose “less is more” is a part of me, along with “simple is beautiful” and such things. And, the artist starts with a blank canvas and has to add, whereas the photographer starts with a full viewfinder and must subtract. I’m very glad you like this, Michael – thank you. A 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

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