GARDEN 71 – ROE DEER

 

 


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We are lucky to have a long back garden, which I have let go largely wild, and which backs out onto even wilder woodland.  This makes for a wide selection of wildlife, often in plain view from our kitchen window – and it was this wonderful natural space that kept me sane when I returned to Bristol from leading wildlife safaris in Kenya, 30 years ago.

We are lucky in seeing deer in our garden, and mostly these are Muntjacs, which are an exotic species, originally native to the Far East, and I’ve posted on these several times – the most recent post is here .

However we have also (far more rarely) seen the larger Roe Deer, which is native to the British Isles, and which is not unusual – if only locally – in Bristol’s leafier outer suburbs.
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And so to 28 May, when a cry of “Large deer in the garden!” brought us to the kitchen window, and the sight of this Roe stag, fully grown antlers and all, beside the garden path.  Cameras and binoculars are always to hand, so I grabbed the Z 6 – forgetting I’d left it in APS-C format – and started photographing.  Opening the kitchen window would almost certainly have scared him off, so the shots were taken looking quite steeply downwards through double glazing – but that’s life! >>> and the basic premise that imperfect shots are always better than no shots at all!

And, taking off the rose-coloured glasses for a moment and looking at the Natural World full-on, there are other living organisms pictured here too – for the two dark spots on the deer’s neck are ticks – ectoparasites – which live on the animal’s bodily fluids.

Click onto each image to open a larger version in a separate window, and click onto that image to further enlarge it – recommended.

Technique: Z 6 with 70-300 Nikkor lens used in DX (= APS-C) format to give 232mm; 1600 ISO; Lightroom, using the Camera Neutral v2 picture control; our back garden, in south Bristol; 28 May 2019.
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About Adrian Lewis
Photographer working in monochrome, colour and combinations of the two - with a great liking for many types of subject, including Minimalism, landscapes, abstracts, soft colour, people, movement, nature - I like to be adventurous in my photography, trying new ideas and working in many genres. And I'm fond of Full English Breakfasts and Duvel golden ale, though not necessarily together.

16 Responses to GARDEN 71 – ROE DEER

  1. Meanderer says:

    What beautiful images with the lovely verdant grass as a backdrop.

    They are lovely creatures but are viewed as a pest due to them eating precious plants – and also because of the ticks they carry.

    Like

    • Adrian Lewis says:

      Viewed as pests, oh how much that gets to me, and how much that says about human nature. Well, Lymes Disease is a concrete and nasty fact, that’s for sure. But, the more I think about it, the concept of gardens – our wanting to tailor Nature to our aesthetic concepts and then being put out when Nature is indifferent to us – and the concept of some harmless living organisms being labelled as “weeds” (cf misfits) – well, I’m able less and less to buy into that. But I’m very glad you like the pics, my friend. A 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

  2. bluebrightly says:

    How exciting, and far prettier than the exotic fauna, which I missed before. The antlers have a graceful line don’t they? I like all the detail in the plants – the horsetails, etc. and the expression in the first photo, good thing you had the camera at hand, whatever the setting!

    Like

    • Adrian Lewis says:

      Thank you, Lynn >>> the female Roe has reappeared (a Roe Doe!) and I’m wondering if we’re now within a pair’s territory; and the Muntjac doe appears to be pregnant – we’ll be up to our necks in deer soon!!! 🙂 🙂 🙂

      Like

  3. paula graham says:

    Lovely to see, sadly not everyone likes these as they eat your roses and are supposed to be escapees from country houses and zoos and originally from foreign lands…and we! Brits are not fond of…..I won’t go there!! xx. Sadly I have seen roe deer running through the streets of Clevedon, there are woodlands here but they do get disturbed of course and flee without thinking.
    I love seeing them and would, and have done, plant roses for them!

    Like

  4. Oh, he’s marvelous, Adrian! And though he is full grown, he’s still young. I did enlarge and then enlarge 😉 and noticed that he still has some “fuzzy stuff” – I don’t know the technical name – at the base of his antlers which he hasn’t finished rubbing off on tree trunks and other rough surfaces. (Though I think it might be called “velvet.”)

    And thank you so much for putting up my Snowy Egret! That was also a case of an imperfect shot being much, much better than no shot at all, as I would have preferred already having a more powerful telephoto lens to better define his feathers. But the best lens in a given situation is the lens that you have with you!

    Like

    • Adrian Lewis says:

      Yes, I think it is velvet >>> and now we have a female Roe frequenting the garden too and we are really enriched; and the female Muntjac looks pregnant, so we may soon have fauns around, as we have before! And >>> GLAD you enlarged and enlarged!!!!!!

      Every other day, I make a point of using WordPress’s Discover facility to look around others’ posts, and any posts that I Like automatically appear in the part of this blog’s sidebar that you are referring to – I like to showcase others’ work. A 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

  5. dawnbirdau says:

    This is so cool! Gorgeous shot against that lovely green. My ex was born in Bristol but grew up in Canada. We spent a few months in Stroud which is a happy memory.

    Like

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