SOMERSET LEVELS 343 – SWANS ABOVE TEALHAM MOOR (MONO)

 

 


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This image contains a lot of detail and is best viewed enlarged: click onto it to open a larger version in a separate window, and click onto that image to further enlarge it – recommended.

Looking eastwards across Tealham Moor at 7am, with the sun risen and mist rising into the cool air.Β  There are no sounds, save for those of the light breeze and, as is so often the case here, gently running water.

And then the singing of Mute Swans’ wings, and three of them, flying quite low, heading north across the moor.

(And another bird to see: a Rook, one of the crows, perched on the dark fencing at lower right; its looking towards the camera, and can only be seen as a dark bird with a pale face – the latter in fact being the pale grey bill and the bare, pale grey skin on the face – the bird uses its longish (for a crow) bill for probing into turf and earth, looking for worms, insects, etc, and its bare facial skin is presumably less soiled (every pun intended!) by the dirt than facial feathers would be.)

Technique: Z 6 with 70-300 Nikkor lens used in DX (= APS-C) format to give 450mm; 640 ISO; Lightroom, using the Camera Vivid V2 picture control; Silver Efex Pro 2, starting at the High Contrast Green Filter preset and adding a medium coffee tone; looking east across Tealham Moor from just south of Westham, on the Somerset Levels; 3 May 2019.
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About Adrian Lewis
Photographer working in monochrome, colour and combinations of the two - with a great liking for all sorts of images, including Minimalism, landscapes, abstracts, soft colour, people, movement, nature - I like to be adventurous in my photography, trying new ideas and working in many genres. And I'm fond of Full English Breakfasts and Duvel golden ale, though not necessarily together.

39 Responses to SOMERSET LEVELS 343 – SWANS ABOVE TEALHAM MOOR (MONO)

  1. Cathy says:

    Love the way you captured the swans in flight above the low lying mist.

    Like

  2. Great shot – perfect timing!

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  3. bluebrightly says:

    Can I say it’s too busy for my taste? Well, I said it. Linda just sent me the Rachel Talibart link…I will check that. I like the reference to the “singing” of the Mute swans wings. We were at a high mountain pass recently, no one at all around, very quiet, snow on the ground, and a raven flew over us, rather low. I’ve heard the wings before, but this was so loud. I guess because of the quiet . He really did “saw” the air. Wonderful. I’m enjoying your conversation with Michael, too – I liked that you said you were shattered and elated after getting out so early,. That sums it up! πŸ˜‰

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    • Adrian Lewis says:

      Re busy I know exactly what you mean, but there aren’t too many options here, particularly of the water + mist at bottom right are to be retained – there might be an argument for excluding them.

      Yes, real quiet is the thing, its amazing what can become apparent then.

      Michael and I are talking a lot and constructively, and as I’ve said this morning, talking with him has really made me get it clearer in my mind about how my photography works. Always good to stand back and look at things. A πŸ™‚

      Like

  4. This series is just magical, Adrian. Like something from fairy tales. And thank you for the reference to Rachael Talibart, whose work is also captivating.

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  5. Beautiful moment! Cheers for the weekend! πŸ™‚

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  6. Meanderer says:

    That’s just lovely, Adrian. Magical!

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  7. Well there is a pastoral scene if I ever saw one. You have given us a wonderful picture. And now I know what a rook is too.

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    • Adrian Lewis says:

      LOL!!! >>> I was a completely enthusiastic birder from 1967 to about 2002, and so birds are really in my blood! >>> for those Across The Pond, knowing what a Rook is could well be a significant ice breaker at staid social events!!! πŸ˜‰

      I’m very glad you like the picture – have been out on the Levels very early today, and now feel absolutely shattered, but somewhat elated too – as usual I suppose. Adrian πŸ™‚

      Liked by 1 person

      • Thank you. This has been an absolutely wonderful series of images over the past few days.

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        • Adrian Lewis says:

          Michael, thank you very much – and especially for your comment on the past few days’ posts – such thoughts certainly provide encouragement and motivation.

          I like to try to vary my images, both in terms of genre and approach. I do think that, recently, the new Z 6 has given me quite a positive creative jolt; and then there’s the idea of carrying two cameras down to the Levels. Am about to get the 70-300 AF-P Nikkor, which I think will be an improvement on my older model; 70-300 is a very favourite range for me.

          I’ve been reading about photography of the sublime, as written about by a land- and seascape photographer called Rachael Talibart, who can be googled. You may already know of her, but if not … google! I suppose the picture I’ve posted today is in the sublime ballpark. Adrian

          Liked by 1 person

          • You’re welcome. I will look up Rachael Talibart. I have the 70 – 300 AF-P and it is very good. However, what I think is even better is the Tamron 100-400. I am nearly certain that works with the adapter for the Z6. I recommend looking it up.

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            • Adrian Lewis says:

              Yes, look up Rachael Talibart and be inspired >>> LOL! >>> or, if you’re like me, start wondering how you can do better! Thanks for mentioning the Tamron, but I think I’m sticking with the Nikkor – very glad to hear you think its worthwhile. A πŸ™‚

              Liked by 1 person

              • I have to tell you that once I started using the Tamron I never went back to the Nikkor. I’m not trying to push this but I would take a look at some test results.

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                • Adrian Lewis says:

                  Michael, I’m going to stick with an all Nikon set up, I feel good about that. Also, since my images are used mainly for this blog, and 30cmx30cm Blurb photobooks when I get around to compiling them, I don’t need absolute sharpness – and since my older 70-300 has been quite adequate up to now, I can only think that the AF-P version will be an improvement. But thanks for your advice. A πŸ™‚

                  Liked by 1 person

                  • The AF-P is a definite improvement. I’m sure you’ll love it. After seeing your explanation, it is clear to me that our needs are actually quite different. You’re going to love the Nikkor.

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                    • Adrian Lewis says:

                      Oh yes, I think we are quite different in some ways. We are both very keen photographers, with photographers’ eyes and visual awareness, but what we do with our pictures and how we treat/process them is quite different. I suppose I’m all for the resulting image, sometimes/often irrespective of absolute photographic quality. I do enjoy quality equipment like the Z 6 but, with the exception of this AF-P lens, I’ll be using it with my older, F-mount Nikkors, they’ve always been fine for my needs. I’d think about a Z-mount 70-300 if one ever appears, but as far as I know, it hasn’t figured in Nikon’s lens plans yet.

                      Liked by 1 person

                    • Different indeed. Mine are often intended to be huge.

                      Liked by 1 person

              • I have begun to explore Rachael Talibart’s website. Inspiration is an understatement. Thank you X 1000 for the introduction.

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                • Adrian Lewis says:

                  My pleasure, Michael, always glad to be of help. I tear articles out of photographic magazines (mostly Amateur Photographer these days) and keep them for future reference, and found one by her talking about the photography of the sublime from sometime back, which I am devouring and re-devouring.

                  Interesting to talk about our photographic differences, it made me think about what I do. I derive immense satisfaction from creating images – I have inherited an eye for a picture from an artistic grandmother, two of us, both scientists, have it – and I also very much enjoy writing about my images – and hence to this blog.

                  Secondly, because my images are only for this blog and for photobooks, many of which are given as presents, I feel vastly liberated by not having to adhere to immaculate photographic techniques if and when I don’t want to. This is certainly not meant to be a jab at you, we are all different after all, but these thoughts have made it a little clearer to me about where I am and what I do. Adrian πŸ™‚

                  Liked by 1 person

                  • Glad I could help clarify. Likewise, looking at your photography and the photography of many other bloggers helps me to clarify what I’m doing. In that way, we all help each other. I have been devouring Rachael’s website and I am thoroughly inspired.

                    Liked by 1 person

  8. Sherry Felix says:

    I love this photo and the post.

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    • Adrian Lewis says:

      Sherry, that’s very good to hear! I’ve been out on the Levels (very early) today, and now feel completely shattered >>> which is nice! I have some more pictures of birds on flight, but will have to wait until I get them onto the computer to really see how they are. Adrian πŸ™‚

      Like

  9. Goff James says:

    I have reblogged this. Best Wishes.Goff

    Like

  10. Goff James says:

    Hi. Thanks for sharing such a beautiful image. You certainly have captured the light and mood. Happy Photography. Have a great day. Goff

    Like

  11. paula graham says:

    Such an evocative photo.

    Like

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