OUTER SUBURBS 81 – A GOOD NIGHT OUT 2 (POSTSCRIPT)

 

 


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Awhile back, I posted about “Good Nights Out” in south Bristol.  A Good Night Out 2 looked at vandalism of bus shelters, which drew condemnation.  Well, just to keep you in the loop(!), one of the damaged bus shelters that I photographed then has been vandalised again, and here it is – the fragment of paving slab used to inflict  the damage can be seen in the foreground.  The earlier damage to this shelter is shown in the lowest image on the earlier post.

OH DEAR!!! >>> and walking past this bus stop this morning (2 March), I’ve found it vandalised yet again – with what looks suspiciously like the original piece of paving stone.  Such is our world or, at least, some parts of it.  And for those of you considering south Bristol for your holidays this year, be warned that Bristol City Council is considering operating a Zero Tolerance Paving Stone Policy so that, if you’re into this sort of thing, you may have to bring your own boulder.

And at top right, another recent feature of UK life.  All Motor Vehicle Tax, which is notionally paid to build/mend roads, is now paid online, which has of course resulted in some non-payments – and so to clamping of offenders’ cars.

The first image in the Outer Suburbs series, with context, is here: 1 .  Subsequent images are here: 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 45 46 47 48 49 50 51 52 53 54 53a 55 56 57 58 59 60 61 62 63 64 65 66 67 68 69 70 71 72 73 74 75 76 77 78 79 80 .  Each will open in a separate window.

Click onto the image to open a larger version in a separate window, and click onto that image to enlarge it yet again.

Technique: TG-5 at 25mm (equiv); 800 ISO; Lightroom, using the Camera Vivid film simulation; south Bristol; 21 Feb 2019.
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About Adrian Lewis
Photographer working in monochrome, colour and combinations of the two - with a great liking for many types of subject, including Minimalism, landscapes, abstracts, soft colour, people, movement, nature - I like to be adventurous in my photography, trying new ideas and working in many genres. And I'm fond of Full English Breakfasts and Duvel golden ale, though not necessarily together.

21 Responses to OUTER SUBURBS 81 – A GOOD NIGHT OUT 2 (POSTSCRIPT)

  1. bluebrightly says:

    First you made me groan, with the repeat vandalism, then you made me laugh, with the bring your own paving stones! Very good!

    Like

  2. Meanderer says:

    At the risk of sounding like “Brenda from Bristol”: not again! Doing it for kicks is my guess – something youngsters have been doing for decades. Woke up this morning to hear that another fatal stabbing of a youngster had taken place; awful news. In a way, it feels like something huge and damaging is happening in society. It feels as if so much is out of control or is just teetering out of control – but because things happen slowly – over decades – one hardly notices as it’s happening.

    I guess the council will get fed up of replacing the glass or will replace it with something that doesn’t look as nice – which won’t go down well within a city on the up and up.

    Like

  3. 😀 ..Mine was vandalized as well….

    Like

  4. paula graham says:

    Sad, that it has come to this all over the world, everywhere.

    Like

  5. Kelly MacKay says:

    Time to replace it with metal instead of glass.

    Like

    • Adrian Lewis says:

      Yes, I think so, or something transparent that is shatterproof – but then the latter might only provide a challenge. Frustrating times we are in.

      Liked by 1 person

      • Kelly MacKay says:

        This vandal seems to be looking to get caught. Maybe attentions seeking.

        Like

        • Adrian Lewis says:

          Yes it could well be attention seeking, or seeking admiration from peers – one thing that I am very conscious of are the pressures that our modern world has placed upon on young people these days, and the increasing incidence of juvenile mental health problems.

          I’m getting old and crusty, while still doing my best not to see the past through rose-coloured glasses – my childhood was NOT in some innocent paradise – but still, many of the pressures that the young have to face today were simply not around way back, eg social media, drugs, the targeting of the young by mega bucks advertising campaigns – I suppose I’m saying that the modern world, increasingly, does not give children the time to be children but, rather, presses the adult world upon them at earlier and earlier ages. A 🙂

          Like

          • Kelly MacKay says:

            I disagree, it was a different kind of pressure and responsibility placed on on children in the past. It was wasn’t spoken about like it is today because of social media.

            Like

            • Adrian Lewis says:

              That’s an interesting point. Social media certainly do bring things out into the open, which can only be a good thing. But I can only reference my own childhood, as much as I can remember of it, and I can’t recall being especially under pressure – it was life and, unthinkingly maybe, I just went through it.

              And there is an example from nearer than my childhood. Amongst the increase of juvenile mental health problems, there have been many from university students, including quite a number of suicides. Well I can’t recall anything like this from my university days in the late 1960s-mid 1970s, and talking about this to a friend this week, neither could he. As he put it, well we just went there, put our heads down, and got on with the work. I don’t think there was the pressure to succeed as there is now and, of course, since our education has become a commodity, students are having to worry about whether the many thousands of pounds they are having to spend on their tuition fees are going to give a good return vis a vis the salaries they are going to earn later on.

              Like

              • Kelly MacKay says:

                Yes, I do agree about the pressure of huge education loans. I just had this conversation two days ago with a friend. I have a 23 year old coworker that has $80,000 worth of debt lots from school but lots from traveling, and putting rent and desires on a credit card. This is a huge burden to start a career with.
                I was always sure if I walked into a place with my resume and got front of the person hiring, I would get the job, Now a resume gets sent online and you either get selected for an interview or not, based on your resume. Hard workers maybe getting screened out in the process.
                I work with many fine young people, We have a great job, Monday to Friday, no evenings no weekends, pension benefits, huge advancement opportunities, and solid pay. Yet most of them are always looking for another job. They are unsatisfied and unmotivated, If they spend as much time applying themselves to the work they have, and building their resume, instead of spending work hours at the computer looking for another job,

                Like

                • Adrian Lewis says:

                  Kelly, its interesting hearing your views – “putting rent and desires in a credit card” is a phrase which especially resonates. Being selfish, I have to admit to being glad that I’m not a young person today. I have been thinking about having as much as I wanted of my life over again. My wife said she would start again, and do many things very differently. But, if I were given this option, I think I would only go back to the day I retired from work, in 2013, since retirement has certainly given me my life back and, the aches and pains of older age notwithstanding, I feel very grateful for this wonderful freedom. Adrian 🙂

                  Like

                  • Kelly MacKay says:

                    I wouldn’t go back either. I couldn’t do all that hard work over again, uggg. I’m not retired yet still 9 years to go. I’m still working hard but, less in front than behind me. Cheers

                    Liked by 1 person

  6. Seeing this first thing the morning is not a good start to my day. No fault of your own of course. Some people are pathetic! You have an eye though, bud. 😉 📸
    XXXATPXXX
    ❤️💎❤️

    Like

    • Adrian Lewis says:

      My dear, thank you. To me this scene has a definite sadness; I wonder what sort of life those responsible have; any prospects, I wonder. As Don McCullin, a photographic hero of mine, said in a documentary recently, talking about his early life in London, “We were a bunch of kids, going nowhere.”. ATP xxxXXX!!!

      Liked by 1 person

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