STANTON DREW 58 – THE VIEW NORTHEAST FROM THE STANDING STONES (MONO)

 

 


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This image is certainly best viewed enlarged: click onto it to open a larger version in a separate window, and click onto that image to enlarge it further – recommended.

A view from the prehistoric standing stones in Stanton Drew .  What can we see?  Two of the standing stones are on the right of the image, with another, now toppled, off to the left.  Behind these are a line of trees and dark undergrowth, along the banks of the little River Chew.  Beyond this, some farm buildings can just be seen, and there is a flock of sheep up on the slopes in the distance.

A very tranquil scene: this is in fact (originally) the biggest prehistoric henge in the country, but it has none of the crowds and commercialism seen at the far better known sites at Stonehenge and Avebury.  This is a wonderful place to come for a quiet walk, in open and relatively unspoilt English countryside – and it is adjacent to the similarly quiet and peaceful churchyard, another wonderful spot for peace and quiet reflection, from which I have posted many images (you can find them under this blog’s Stanton Drew category >>> use the drop down Category list in this blog’s sidebar).

Earlier images from this early morning shoot are here: 1 (with context) 2 3 4 .  Each will open in a separate window.

Technique: X-T2 with 55-200 Fujinon lens at 111mm (equiv); 400 ISO; Lightroom, using the Velvia/Vivid film simulation; Silver Efex Pro 2, starting at the Strong Infrared Low Contrast preset and adding a light tone; Stanton Drew, in the Chew Valley south of Bristol; 14 Dec 2018.
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About Adrian Lewis
Photographer working in monochrome, colour and combinations of the two - with a great liking for all sorts of images, including Minimalism, landscapes, abstracts, soft colour, people, movement, nature - I like to be adventurous in my photography, trying new ideas and working in many genres. And I'm fond of Full English Breakfasts and Duvel golden ale, though not necessarily together.

16 Responses to STANTON DREW 58 – THE VIEW NORTHEAST FROM THE STANDING STONES (MONO)

  1. krikitarts says:

    This invites a lengthy walk through those gentle hills. It looks mostly overcast and maybe just a bit drizzly–my favorite photo conditions!

    Like

  2. What a wonderful composition, Adrian! I’m struck by the dotting of sheep and sloping tree lines down the hill behind the stones—the every day mingling with the ancient. The monochrome treatment is just right.

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  3. bluebrightly says:

    I love it, Adrian. Are those sheep up on the hill? There’s something exciting about the delicacy of the little white figures splayed out over the slope far in the distance, and the solidity of the stone in the forefront, together. To my American mind, this is quintessential English countryside. I like the way you processed it (and it sounds like a strange, roundabout method, making the film simulation, then going to Silver Efex and doing infrared) and it conveys a lot of warmth. I’m so fond of the picture that I’d love to see different renditions, too.

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    • Adrian Lewis says:

      Lynn, I’m glad its gets to you – thank you! Yes, those are sheep up on the hill. I think that I think of it as quintessential English countryside too, and value it for being that – while being aware that some bits of rural England look very different. And the processing, yes, that’s my method, produce the film simulation first, sometimes with false colours/contrast to enhance the ensuing mono, and then set SEP2 loose on it. Not sure that I’ll do different renditions though; I did try colour, but this mono really got to me. Thanks again. A 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

      • bluebrightly says:

        You’re a fountain of processing ideas, Adrian. I never thought of that, and I wonder if doing it that way stems from having a background in film and printing. At least in the way film works. Anyway, I’m playing with it, and I like what I’m seeing. Thank you!

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        • Adrian Lewis says:

          Yes, that’s it >>> you may end up with a colour image that looks nothing like reality >>> but the important thing is how that transfers to (and hopefully enhances) the black and white end product. A 🙂 🙂 🙂

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  4. Wow! Beautiful image, Adrian!

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  5. Sonali Dalal says:

    Like the composition here !

    Like

  6. paula graham says:

    A beauty of a picture.

    Like

  7. TinyJeremy says:

    Nice black and white photo

    Like

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