ARCHIVE 364 – INSIDE THE FLOWER OF A DOG ROSE

 

 


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Inside the flower of a Dog Rose.

I ought to know what the tall structures are but, as I firmly bade farewell to studying anything botanical in 1968, I’m unsure.  Stamens maybe?   ….. I’m more sure of one who will know the answer …. wonder who that can be??? …….. ?

Getting away from reality – oh, that’s better!!! …. –  the blurred dark element almost reaching the lower right corner, and a similar dark object diametrically across the flower’s centre, look like slim, beating wings.  And the blurred, slightly greenish “thing”(!) in the lower left corner might be a beak – so is this some exotic bird in flight, with bizarre and erect plumes on its back?

And if you don’t believe that such feathers exist, search Google’s images for flight shots of breeding plumage male Standard-winged Nightjars – and I have a feeling there are other examples in the Far East and South America too.  Ah, signs of a misspent youth …

The rose’s petals are pale, and serve as a diffuse backdrop.

Click onto the image to open another version in a separate window, and click onto that image to enlarge it.

Technique: D700 with 105mm Nikkor lens; 6400 ISO; our back garden, Bristol; 24 June 2013.

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About Adrian Lewis
Photographer working in monochrome, colour and combinations of the two - with a great liking for many types of subject, including Minimalism, landscapes, abstracts, soft colour, people, movement, nature - I like to be adventurous in my photography, trying new ideas and working in many genres. And I'm fond of Full English Breakfasts and Duvel golden ale, though not necessarily together.

17 Responses to ARCHIVE 364 – INSIDE THE FLOWER OF A DOG ROSE

  1. krikitarts says:

    Your other readers have been very helpful, I see, with floral anatomy–good for them, and for you! It’s good to see you getting really intimate with your subjects again, and it’s very good to be getting back into the WP saddle, starting with you!

    Like

    • Adrian Lewis says:

      Gary, my friend, its very good to see you around again! This is actually a photo from sometime back. I’m in a bit of a photographic lull at the moment, which is partly a result of what for the UK is a real heatwave, but I’m hanging on in there. A 🙂

      Like

  2. bluebrightly says:

    The green thingie’s probably the sepal, but I know botanical terms make people’s eyes glaze over….that nightjar, however, is absolutely fantastic! I can’t remember ever seeing photos of that bird, so thank you. Nature wins out every time, right? We have a few nightjars, named for the repetitive evening calls, the Whippoorwill and Chuck Will’s Widow. I’ve heard both, but not in years…check out this close-up Adrian, you’ll like it!
    https://www.audubon.org/field-guide/bird/eastern-whip-poor-will
    Populations are down 60% for both birds, I just read. Sad.

    Like

    • Adrian Lewis says:

      Oh yes, absolutely wonderful close up – thanks for the link! Many, many bird populations are down here, and humanity has to be a major cause – it appears we are in another of Life’s great extinctions, like those that have occurred in the geological past, except that, in the Anthropocene, we are the prime movers. I can remember birding in the late 1960s, and I’m sure there were more birds about then. Yes, sad, very sad. A 😦

      Like

  3. bluebrightly says:

    Lovely, and isn’t it nice the way your readers all jump to answer the question? 🙂

    Like

    • Adrian Lewis says:

      Thank you – and yes it is nice >>> I’ve just got to be careful that I don’t ask anything along the lines of “In your view, how can I make myself a more rounded human being?”, as I wouldn’t want to bring WordPress’s servers down … 😉 …

      Like

  4. Oh, dear; I feel called upon. But I have to check first, lest I make a terrible mistake. . . . Yes, stamens. And my botanist husband says the things on the end are called anthers. I really don’t know these things; I always have to ask him. I find this photograph to be terribly romantic, Adrian. Can’t figure out how you got into the flower like that.

    Like

    • Adrian Lewis says:

      Love the romantic thing – no pun intended! 🙂 – and I do see what you mean. Can’t recall how I got the shot – apparently just peeping over the flower’s rim, very close in with a macro lens. A 🙂

      Like

  5. Meanderer says:

    That’s lovely, Adrian. How inviting it looks! Yes – stamens, with brown anthers sitting atop.

    I like your comparison with the plumage of exotic birds. I can see it!

    Like

    • Adrian Lewis says:

      M, thanks very much – civilising the FATman edges forwards … 😉 … Yes, the bird thing – I never got to see a Standard-winger Nightjar, but I did see its close relative, the Pennant-winged N – in Rwanda I think. Glad this gets to you. A 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

  6. Anther (top fuzzy looking thing where pollen is produced) + Filament (stem holding up the anther) = Stamen.
    I’m sure you didn’t think I’d be the one to have the answer and I did have to look it up but there it is. One always need to be learning stuff, sir. 😉 🌹
    P. S. I LOVE this shot! 🌹XXXATPXXX🌹

    Like

  7. paula graham says:

    Beautiful and delicate colour palette.

    Liked by 1 person

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