STILL LIFE 99 – PARKED CAR REFLECTING ARCHITECTURE AND BLUE SKY

 

 

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Reflections in the bodywork of a parked car.  The blue sky can be seen left of centre, with distorted reflections of buildings around it.  The other reflections are from the car itself.

Technique: a first for this blog, in that although Lightroom has been used afterwards for final processing, this image was initially generated by the X-T2’s Raw Conversion facility.  In-camera, this facility allows Raw files to be edited in various ways – Push/Pull Processing, Film Simulation, Dynamic Range, Grain Effect, White Balance, Cropping, etc, etc – and then to be saved as jpegs while leaving the original Raw files intact.  In this case, the Raw file was given the look of Fuji’s Velvia film simulation, which (as users of Velvia film may remember), boosts colours and contrast.  Sitting down with the camera after a photo session, I find this a useful and creative way of looking through what the session has captured, as well as experimenting with the images to see what looks and crops may be eyecatching – and then saving those that appear useful.

I have a sneaking feeling that some photographic purists might consider this cheating, because I’m letting the camera do some of the processing work for me whereas I ought to be handling the whole of the processing myself in eg Lightroom.  Well, two thoughts about that.  First, I have always said – and it has always been a very core part of my photographic thinking – that all that matters in photography is the final image, irrespective of the way(s) in which it has been generated.  And second, if I generate something like this image, am I really going to expend lots of time and energy seeking to replicate it with Lightroom, when I already have something useable to hand?

Click onto the image to open a larger version in a separate window.

Technique: X-T2 with 55-200 Fujinon lens at 305mm (equiv); 200 ISO; jpeg with the Velvia film simulation generated from a Raw file in-camera; Lightroom; King Street, central Bristol; 7 Apr 2017.

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About Adrian Lewis
Photographer working in monochrome, colour and combinations of the two - with a great liking for all sorts of images, including Minimalism, landscapes, abstracts, soft colour, people, movement, nature - I like to be adventurous in my photography, trying new ideas and working in many genres. And I'm fond of Full English Breakfasts and Duvel golden ale, though not necessarily together.

19 Responses to STILL LIFE 99 – PARKED CAR REFLECTING ARCHITECTURE AND BLUE SKY

  1. Sallyann says:

    Makes me want to jump straight in… With that kinda Trebor “Mr Soft” feeling… 😀

    Like

    • Adrian Lewis says:

      Well remember I can’t swim … but I will wave with considerable aplomb and just a dash of panache as you … disappear … gurgle gurgle … 😉 … Any news on the relocating yet? Hope you’ve had a good Easter. 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

  2. Beautiful colour and fluidity to the photo.

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  3. bluebrightly says:

    Smooth shapes, and such handsome colors!
    I was just remarking on this topic in another post – you may not know Patti, an expat living in NY.
    https://nylondaze.com/2017/04/10/5th-avenue/
    You KNOW I’m with you. My Olympus has a similar process, leaving the RAW intact and producing a jpeg with the filter. But the in camera filters are very different from the Fujifilm’s, and I’d love to have both! Both cameras, why not? Oh, money… Oh well. 🙂 Happy weekend to you!

    Like

    • Adrian Lewis says:

      Thank you, Lynn, glad it gets to you! Well, small world (but maybe not when blogging) – I DO know Patti, we have corresponded on my blog in the past – I’ve just had a look at her blog, striking stuff.

      I like the Fujifilm colours very much, and Amateur Photographer mag tells me that Fuji and Olympus have some of the best colours going. But there is something on LR that may give you access to Adobe’s replication of Olympus’s colours/filters – get into the Develop module, and scroll right down to the bottom of the column of utilities on the right, the column that has the Histogram at the top. At the bottom you’ll see Camera Calibration. Open this, choose 2012 (I imagine), and below this you’ll see Profile and, opposite it, the words Adobe Standard beside the symbol for a dropdown list – click onto this drop down symbol, and you may see Olympus colours/filters. Now, I’m subscribing to Adobe, so I have the latest LR; if your LR is old, this list may not be there, or it may be incomplete. However, have a look. I’d be interested to hear what you find. A 🙂

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      • bluebrightly says:

        I do have the subscription, so the latest version. I hadn’t clicked on that final piece – the profile. More to play with! Just what I need! Yikes….Thanks!

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        • Adrian Lewis says:

          Excellent!!! Go for it!!! Do you shoot Raw, then? I find it useful to work through several of the film simulations that LR provides, and to have the History tab open on the left – this tab records each simulation I use and sets them out in a vertical list – and then rather than have LR create any of the simulations a second time, I can simply click onto the History to see them in any order I like, over and over. Useful? 🙂

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          • bluebrightly says:

            Yes, I’m shooting RAW and didn’t know LR had those film simulations – so cool! I just wish you could run through them faster, like you can on Color efex, but I have used a few already. Your hints and tips are very useful – there is so much there in these applications and software, it seems different people use different aspects more, or better than other people.
            On Tue. I took a Landscape webinar that’s usually $99 (it’s about 8 hrs long) but was offered free. The photographer, Marc Meunch, is incredibly adept with the brush in LR and can transform an image from blah to captivating in a minute, without having it look fake or overdone. Check out Creativelive – they often run a class for free on certain days, just get on the email list. Thanks Adrian!

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            • Adrian Lewis says:

              Its my pleasure, Lynn, I always like passing on tips and expertise if I can – re the film simulations, try that thing I mentioned with the open History tab, it works very well. I think its like many computer programmes, we all use “our own bits” and leave other bits unknown. I pick up a lot of tips from Amateur Photographer magazine, and from the vast LR book I bought. Using LR’s brush is something I’ve heard is very useful – I’ve tried it, but can’t really seem to get into it. Very glad to be of assistance! 🙂

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  4. I’m no photographer but makes sense to me. I agree with Harrie. Creator instead of observer. Pulls the ‘unique’ in you. 😉 ❤ATP❤

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  5. paula graham says:

    Love it totally.

    Like

  6. For me it works like this: the more abstract the photo gets, the more ‘cheating is allowed’, because you become a creator in stead of an observer… Fine image 🙂

    Like

    • Adrian Lewis says:

      Harrie, I like your way of thinking, its very good to be in touch with you! Becoming a creator instead of an observer is a very good way of putting it – but I will of course also be using such techniques with more pictorial shots – while, of course, saying what I’ve done processingwise. For me, I suppose, the only real no-no is to heavily process something, and then to try and convince others its straight out of the camera.

      Looking forward to some good beer later. The local Tesco supermarket has actually started selling Westmalle Dubbel, which was a real surprise; and it always sells Duvel. And I have some very nice artisan bread – saying goodbye to my waistline – which was in any case always a dubious concept! – NOW!!!!! …… 😀

      Like

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