SOMERSET LEVELS 265 – RAINY MORNING

 

 

rainy-morning
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Westhay Moor; 14 Sept 2015.

Particularly as my years accumulate, there are times when I’m immensely grateful for the shelter afforded by a car – and this was on of those times.

Early morning, and as I pushed on westwards across Westhay Moor, the skies opened.  The road was soon awash, and all of my car’s windows were firmly closed.  Then a large tractor loomed inexorably at me out of the murk and, on the single track highway, there was no alternative but to try and get my smaller car off the road – and I ended up on (thankfully!) firmish ground beside the gateway to a field.

The tractor rumbled by and, as usual, the ground all around shook like a jelly from the shock of its weight – the roads and indeed the ground around here have few foundations, for 60 or more feet below the surface of the ground there is only wet peat and clay.

I made to pull back onto the road again but glanced left as I did so – and found myself looking into this face, that was peering out at me through the gate’s bars.

The rain was still sheeting down, the car windows were running with water and so was he.  I felt for him, I have to say, I was so glad to be dry.  And I lifted the camera off the passenger seat, cranked up the ISO and, with little hope of success, took his picture.

Top quality it certainly isn’t, but maybe it gives a feel for the moment.

D700 with 70-300 Nikkor at 300mm; 3200 ISO; Color Efex Pro 4.
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About Adrian Lewis
Photographer working in monochrome, colour and combinations of the two - with a great liking for all sorts of images, including Minimalism, landscapes, abstracts, soft colour, people, movement, nature - I like to be adventurous in my photography, trying new ideas and working in many genres. And I'm fond of Full English Breakfasts and Duvel golden ale, though not necessarily together.

35 Responses to SOMERSET LEVELS 265 – RAINY MORNING

  1. brilliant image!!

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  2. Meanderer says:

    As soon as this popped up in my email notifications I thought it was wonderful. Great composition, and I love how you’ve captured the texture of his coat and the dark grey and brown colours – so beautiful even in such awful conditions. The yellow tag adds definition so we can understand the image. Good stuff 🙂

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  3. This is wonderful. I think it’s brilliant. Even without the story (which makes it even better). Love the texture and the crispness up front, fade out behind, brilliant yellow tag and that eye that we can’t decide where to look, they’re both and all so interesting. Artist with a camera, guy. Bravo!

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    • Adrian Lewis says:

      Laura, thank you! I’ve done portraits like this before, with the animal’s face or part of it, and letting the background be the gradually less focused flank. When photographing large animals I often like to get in close, filling the frame with the creature. A

      Liked by 1 person

  4. Helen Cherry says:

    It certainly does give a feel of the moment.. very much so Adrian..

    Wanted to tell you too that my request for ill-health retirement has finally been approved.. YAY !! I’ll soon be free…

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    • Adrian Lewis says:

      Helen, I’m absolutely OVER THE MOON that your retirement request has been approved, WONDERFUL NEWS!!! I would have been totally downcast had you been refused, both in terms of the principle of the thing, and your personal wellbeing / happiness. I can recommend retirement wholeheartedly. Are you actually back at work now? I very much hope not. All best wishes from me. A 😀

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  5. Sallyann says:

    Moo-oo.
    Poor fella, but at least he had his coat on. 😊

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  6. I like countryside

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    • Adrian Lewis says:

      Moi aussi – I can’t possibly put this into French, Claire, but I feel more at peace dans la campagne – quand je vais au ville, I feel more “closed in” and stressed. A 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

      • I know what you mean. I like countryside because I ‘m not stressed. I like hearing singing birds every morning. In town, it’s too noisy peculiarly in Paris, Lille and so on. However, I lived in a small town in Southern West France who was very quiet and there were sheep not far away from the station.

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        • Adrian Lewis says:

          Well, your English puts my French very much to shame, Claire, I hadn’t realised that you’re so fluent! I can identify very much with what you say. I’m retired from work now for over three years, and I’m very much allowing myself to drop out of many of the more rushed and stressful aspects of modern life. My visits to towns now are usually either for photography, or to buy books and special (Belgian) beers! Thank you very much for your thoughts. Adrian 🙂

          Liked by 1 person

          • It’s a pleasure Adrian. I read English articles every day in British and American English. Sometimes I like watching movies in English without subtitles because I want to hear the original voices and the ideas. Towns are often very sressful and I prefer living in a peaceful place. I go to town to buy books or and so on. I like drinking Belgian beers because I don’t live not far away from Belgium and it’s very easy to have better prices than in France.

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            • Adrian Lewis says:

              Yes, I know what you mean about hearing the voices and actual language. Which Belgian beers do you like? My staple is Duvel, I find it delicious, and its in many supermarkets here. Others are more difficult to find, but luckily we do have a huge beer seller in East Anglia, from which I can shop over the net. My favourites include the beers from the Westmalle Trappist monastery, and also Hoegaarden’s Forbidden Fruits and Grand Cru, as well as Chimay’s White Cap. A 🙂

              Liked by 1 person

  7. paula graham says:

    Yes, that yellow ear tag reminds us that the life of cattle is highly regulated and usually rather short, often no more than 2 years in the case of beef cattle. You have created a pretty photo, showing his best side and ear ornament.

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    • Adrian Lewis says:

      Yes, that book Sapiens that I raved about recently waxes hot and convincingly re modern meat farming methods too, tho I don’t think that’s going to be sufficient to quell my omnivorous tendencies. Its interesting that we don’t harbour similar feelings about crops and fruit, I suppose the thing being that, since they’re plants, we see them as being somehow fundamentally different to animals. A

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  8. Love this one Adrian – that yellow patch really stands out 🙂

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