ARCHIVE 216 – IN THE DIDA GALGALLA DESERT

 

 

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Nomadic tribeswoman leading camels through the Dida Galgalla Desert in northern Kenya; June 1978.

This image is rather pale and insipid because I’ve lightened it to show more detail – it was taken in very harsh, overhead sunlight so that much of the subject matter is in shadow and silhouette.

This photo shows a person and her home on the move.  Amongst other things, the camels are carrying sections of the curved walls and supports of low huts, which will be erected at the new dwelling site.  A nomadic existence is essential in such dry areas – people follow rainfall, which is a source of water for man and animal alike, and also of greenery for the livestock.

This was a hurried photograph – soon after I raised the camera, rocks were flying my way.  Which reminds me of the roving packs of feral – and no doubt rabies-ridden – dogs in the Sultanate of Oman.  They were so used to having rocks thrown at them that there was no need to actually throw anything – all that was required was to momentarily stoop towards the ground as if about to pick up a rock – of which, as here, there was an inexhaustible supply – and the canines were heading quickly for the hills.

There is another photo of this scene here – its taken from much further away, and gives a rather better idea of the arid desolation that this woman is leading her animals through.

OM-1 with 75-150 Zuiko at 150mm; Agfa CT18 colour side rated at 64 ISO.

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About Adrian Lewis
Photographer working in monochrome, colour and combinations of the two - with a great liking for all sorts of images, including Minimalism, landscapes, abstracts, soft colour, people, movement, nature - I like to be adventurous in my photography, trying new ideas and working in many genres. And I'm fond of Full English Breakfasts and Duvel golden ale, though not necessarily together.

16 Responses to ARCHIVE 216 – IN THE DIDA GALGALLA DESERT

  1. krikitarts says:

    I shudder to think back on some of the risky behavior of my youth as well. In this case, it’s a good thing her aim and throwing-arm strength weren’t better!

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  2. love it! Such a timeless scene!

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    • Adrian Lewis says:

      Glad you like it, Cybele – and timeless it is, although these days such a person might well be carrying a mobile phone, which would detract from things for me – but that is course a purely selfish consideration – the wild cannot go on being the true wild just to please me! And, getting older, I can see myself changing – for in those days I always travelled without any means of communication – mobile phones hadn’t been invented and I had no radio – and very fortunately nothing ever went seriously wrong. But now, as I get older and more careful, I’m appalled at the risks I took then – and would not want to drive anywhere now, even around town, without my phone in my pocket! Times change! Adrian

      Liked by 1 person

      • oh I know Adrian! My daughter drives me bonkers – a whole other story. Here we were driving through County Wicklow and Glendalough and she’s hunched over her cell phone!! 😀 But our parents tore out their hair too I suppose with some of our habits! Technology is so handy! Still it seems people almost live and socialize in their screens while a hawk soars above in the wind.

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        • Adrian Lewis says:

          Yes, its true, we did things that exasperated our parents too, and there will always be that aspect of things. But I think there is something else too. Everyone from our parents’ generation, and maybe from their parents’ generation too, has lived through a time of unparalleled technological change, a recent aspect of which is almost universal access to social media – which has brought a devotion to and reliance upon screens of one sort or another.

          I’m not saying that this is necessarily a bad thing, but there is certainly the truth that a person immersed in the “screen world” is not really in the actual world that is surrounding them – and hence for instance the perils of crossing a road while immersed in your phone. And, if being a photographer is our thing, then being receptive to our (at least visual) environment is one of the big things to aim for.

          But the other question that I wonder about is just where all of this is going to end. 3d artificial reality is already with us via (I think) Oculus – and is our future Life experience really going to be ever increasingly technologically provided, is our devotion to screens set to go on increasing? I am unable to get into such an artificial world, I relish being in the here and now – and at 66 I don’t imagine that I’m going to change a lot. But the question remains – just how much more are artificial media going to take over our lives? Will soaring hawks be less and less noticed? A 🙂

          Liked by 1 person

          • oh yes, I know all about it having played a few virtual games myself. I sometimes do visit the virtual world to see the very interesting art immersion people make there. I really don’t know where technology is leading us but I think stories have been written about people getting trapped by the illusions of virtuality as they leave the physical world behind. It can be very compelling to a story teller to have a virtual storybook. However until if ever it can simulate all your senses I’m still inspired by the five sensory experience of life.

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            • Adrian Lewis says:

              Probably being more of a stick in the mud than you – and ever mindful, for legal reasons of course, that you may not be a stick in the mud at all 😉 – I think I’ll choose to stick (there’s that word again!) with life, even if technology gets to produce an all singing and dancing, all 5 senses, artificial experience. Actually, certain Belgian beers (Duvel is one) do quite a good job on their own – and they taste nice too! 😉

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              • Oh I totally agree Adrian. I just like to visit those places every so often. Keep my finger in what’s going on technologically. I find it both disturbing and fascinating but I ‘m with you on the beer thing lol!!

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          • PS very enjoyable conversation on this!

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  3. Meanderer says:

    I don’t think I have seen this close-up of the distant mono version before. Love it, Adrian.

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  4. paula graham says:

    another world, another time.

    Liked by 1 person

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