SOMERSET LEVELS 226 – A FARMER AND HIS WIFE, RETURNING FROM THE DAWN CHECK ON THEIR STOCK (MONO)

 

 

The farmer and his wife, returning from the dawn check on their stock
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Foggy morning on Tadham Moor, south of Wedmore; 27 Nov 2014.

A murky early morning, and a farming couple return in their Land Rover from the dawn check on their cattle, making sure that the animals have come through the long November night without harm.

This image was shot at a high ISO due to the use of a telephoto in these poor light conditions.  No attempt has been made to control the resulting coarse grain because, to me, this dense coarseness enhances the impression of that cold and damp start to the day.

Click onto the image to see a larger version in a separate window.

A photo of this couple setting out on their dawn check can be found here.

D700 with 70-300 Nikkor at 240mm; 6400 ISO; Silver Efex Pro 2, starting at the Strong Infrared Low Contrast preset.
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About Adrian Lewis
Photographer working in monochrome, colour and combinations of the two - with a great liking for all sorts of images, including Minimalism, landscapes, abstracts, soft colour, people, movement, nature - I like to be adventurous in my photography, trying new ideas and working in many genres. And I'm fond of Full English Breakfasts and Duvel golden ale, though not necessarily together.

18 Responses to SOMERSET LEVELS 226 – A FARMER AND HIS WIFE, RETURNING FROM THE DAWN CHECK ON THEIR STOCK (MONO)

  1. Sonali Dalal says:

    Wonderfully moody capture.

    Like

  2. Sallyann says:

    This seemed familiar so I followed the link to the earlier photo.
    Having reached the previous post I realised it wasn’t so much the picture that had settled in my memory, it was the thought of second breakfast. 🙂
    Had the misty dampness cleared by elevenses? 😀

    Like

  3. krikitarts says:

    Do you suppose they still take the time, on occasion, to reflect upon and appreciate the magic of their routine sojourn to check on their charges? Do you share your insightful images with them to help with that?

    Like

    • Adrian Lewis says:

      Its hard to know about that, Gary. The answer could be anywhere in a broad spectrum from yes, totally – to no, they just get out there in all weathers and do their work. But I would very strongly suspect that they look after their animals well, and with warm, humane feelings.

      I chat with farmers down on the Levels whenever I can, its very good hearing their views, hearing them talk about the land and their jobs. And they all seem very happy to talk but, as far as I know, I’ve never met this couple, I’ve just seen them driving around. A

      Like

  4. I saw this and it is instantly recognisable as one of yours Adrian. I do love your photos 🙂 This is a ‘beauty’ – dark and moody – just what you would expect from an early morning journey.

    Liked by 1 person

  5. ehpem says:

    I really like this Adrian. Until I read your text I assumed it was shot on film in low light. Which would have been a good thing too!

    Like

    • Adrian Lewis says:

      ephem, thank you very much – and having just visited your blog, I must say that I like your images too, a lot of good stuff there. And you’ve been putting out a post a day since 2011??? Full admiration from me – that’s a real achievement!

      Film? I’m glad that this image gives that effect – if you don’t know it already, I very much recommend Silver Efex Pro 2 for black and white photography. I’ve been photographing for over 50 years and the bulk of that was of course on film, but I’m firmly wedded to digital now. Thanks again. Adrian 🙂

      Like

      • ehpem says:

        Thanks for you kind words Adrian, and for that trail of likes through my blog! I honestly can’t recommend a post-a-day – it becomes a bit like a job sometimes, and can dilute the quality too. And then there is the weekly post at 52 Rolls as well … not sure that was wise to add to the load.

        I’ve heard a lot about Silver Efex Pro and have been feeling the limitations of Topaz B&W and LR5 so may well be shopping for new software soon and SEP is definitely at the top of the list. You will have noticed that I am shooting a lot of film these days, but I often do B&W conversions from colour negatives, especially from colour-shifted expired film.

        Like

        • Adrian Lewis says:

          No, I know – I’ve done it too for quite long periods – a post a day is hard work! But I’ve developed a routine for posting, and that helps. Another thing is to post already published photos again, as Archive material – there is, after all, no reason at all why a worthwhile image should not be seen more than once – and there is also the point that Followers new to our blogs won’t have seen our earlier material at all. I have an Archive category on my blog. Oh, and Silver Efex Pro – its not stand alone, it has to be run as a plug in from Photoshop Elements (which is what I do, tho I use Elements for nothing else), Photoshop itself or Lightroom. It is a part of a package called Nik Software (originally developed by Nikon), which Google now sells. Also in the package is Color Efex Pro 4, which I also find very useful. Hope this is useful. To me, if someone is keen / serious about photography, then adequate software is a must – but that’s just my view and one thing that blogging has taught me is that we’re all different in our views! Adrian 🙂

          Like

          • ehpem says:

            Thanks for all the useful information Adrian. And that is a good idea about having an archive recycling project – I have only done that once or twice and only when I rework an image as I get better with processing. No reason to not get the 2 or 3 year old stuff back out there! Some of it was OK.

            Liked by 1 person

            • Adrian Lewis says:

              Yes, that’s the thing, “some of it”. When I look at my early posts now there are certainly some I don’t think much good – but there are others that stand the test of time, and there’s no reason in the world why they shouldn’t be shown again – in almost all instances, I’ve found that even long time followers enjoy seeing them again – even if they recall their first airing. A

              Liked by 1 person

  6. paula graham says:

    A farmer’s life is not a bed of roses, as so graphically portrayed by you.

    Like

    • Adrian Lewis says:

      Absolutely right. 40 years ago I was lodging on a sheep farm in the Southern Uplands, using it as a base for geological research – and how I wish my mind then had been as my mind is now – I would have become much more involved in the farm – and taken far more photos. And thinking too of photos taken on Devon farms, are you familiar with the wonderful mono photography of James Ravilious, son of the artist Eric Ravilious? I think you might like it. A

      Liked by 1 person

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