STANTON DREW 26 – THE CEMETERY WALL 1 (MONO)

 

 

The cemetery wall 1
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The jagged top to the original cemetery wall, beyond which an extension to the cemetery is just coming into use; 22 Oct 2014.

I love being in the grounds of the church of Saint Mary The Virgin in Stanton Drew, and have posted pictures from here before (search this blog under the “Stanton Drew” Category, via the widget low down in the sidebar). 

The village has a fairly busy country lane (and even a bus route!) on one of its sides, but on the other side, on the way down towards the church and the prehistoric stone circles, it is very much of a dead end, so that its quiet and more or less free of traffic – a delightful and tranquil little English backwater.

The church started use in the 13th century, and the ground immediately around it bulges up – presumably due to the many thousands of burials there over the centuries.  The more distant parts of the churchyard appear less congested, and now this small extension to the cemetery lies out beyond the old churchyard wall, over towards the neighbouring farm. 

The hedge that divides this new extension from the neighbouring fields can just be seen at upper left.  The pale patches on the wall’s stones are lichen, and similar palenesses on the ground beyond are fallen autumn leaves.

D700 with 24-120 Nikkor at 24mm; 1600 ISO; Silver Efex Pro 2, starting at the High Contrast Harsh preset.
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About Adrian Lewis
Photographer working in monochrome, colour and combinations of the two - with a great liking for all sorts of images, including Minimalism, landscapes, abstracts, soft colour, people, movement, nature - I like to be adventurous in my photography, trying new ideas and working in many genres. And I'm fond of Full English Breakfasts and Duvel golden ale, though not necessarily together.

20 Responses to STANTON DREW 26 – THE CEMETERY WALL 1 (MONO)

  1. drawandshoot says:

    Wonderful, all dark and moody and aged.

    Like

  2. I love cemeteries and this photo is certainly one of my faves. ❤️ Plus, it looks familiar. 💋

    Like

  3. paula graham says:

    Good photo, Adrian. Speaks to me on an emotional level and as a photo, looking at the interesting, simple composition and processing.

    Like

    • Adrian Lewis says:

      That’s good to hear, Paula. Thought you might like it as you’re so into mono – but am thinking it might be a little grim, in both content and tone, for various others! Adrian

      Like

  4. I like the composition of this. Two strong lines.

    Like

  5. Sue Vincent says:

    Haven’t been there in a few years… Must go back soon, I think.

    Like

    • Adrian Lewis says:

      Hi Sue! Yes, this is a place for you – can meet you there if you like. I used to think that, to help with Christianisation, churches were often sited near prehistoric circles etc, but I think that Ronald Hutton discounts this in his latest tome. Adrian (NB in case you receive more than one copy of this reply, WordPress has twice chewed up my attempts and, as far as I can see, they haven’t been sent to you!!! !”£$%^&*())))!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!)

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      • Sue Vincent says:

        Hi Adrian, that would be wonderful when I can get down there!
        There is the infamous letter from Gregory I to Mellitus, of course, which supports the theory… and the sheer volume of ancient Christianised sites…”So when almighty God has led you to the most reverend man our brother Bishop Augustine, tell him what I have long gone over in my mind concerning the matter of the English: that is, that the shrines of idols amongst that people should be destroyed as little as possible, but that the idols themselves that are inside them should be destroyed. Let blessed water be made and sprinkled in these shrines, let altars be constructed and relics placed there: since if the shrines are well built it is necessary that they should be converted from the worship of demons to the service of the true God, so that as long as that people do not see their very shrines being destroyed they may put out error from their hearts and in knowledge and adoration of the true God they may gather at their accustomed places more readily.”
        ( Only got the one 🙂 )

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        • Adrian Lewis says:

          I can’t find the quote at the moment – I’m appalling my wife by highlighting all notable bits in Hutton’s book! – but I will continue to look. And glad you only got the one!!! 🙂

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          • Sue Vincent says:

            Hutton isn’t going to convince me.. my feet and the ‘feel’ has done that 🙂

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            • Adrian Lewis says:

              But he will convince me. A

              Like

              • Sue Vincent says:

                I may have to read him just to get a fair picture 🙂

                Like

                • Adrian Lewis says:

                  Well, its a tome!, and the breadth of material he covers, complete with fully annotated bibliography, is simply staggering. As far as I can see, he looks at the evidence, gives series of possibilities and implications to fit the evidence – and admits what simply is not known. And he includes chronological reviews of various recent UK beliefs and phenomena – ley lines are one example, the evolution of archaeological techniques, thinking and fashions is another, as is the relationship between the archaeological community and New Agers etc – which I find very illuminating indeed.

                  And of course, along with spiritual feelings, I have a scientist’s mind – Hutton’s logical approach appeals to me.

                  One thing I’m very interested in is early Man, and the news recently had humans coming out of Africa around 50,000-60,000 years ago, and interbreeding with Neanderthal Man – I think it mentioned a 40,000 or so years old genome having been found. Fascinating stuff.

                  Anyway, have a look at Hutton, its good stuff. A

                  Like

                  • Sue Vincent says:

                    I will… in a sort of double whammy of feminine contrariness, I may walk in the spiritual world but I am a Virgo and like nice, organised facts too 🙂

                    Like

                    • Adrian Lewis says:

                      Well organised its certainly is, Sue – and its entitled “Pagan Britain”, ISBN 978-0-300-19771-6. Another thing I like about it is that it was published only last year, so its quite up to date. Thoughts and knowledge on so many things are changing very fast – early Man is a prime example – and so its good to get something recent. Hope you like it! A (And love “double whammy of feminine contrariness”!!! 🙂 )

                      Like

                    • Sue Vincent says:

                      I’ll add it to the pile, Adrian… though I may be gone some time 😉

                      Liked by 1 person

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