ARCHIVE 97 – THE BLINDS ARE CLOSED

 

 

The blinds are closed
.
Bathroom blinds in a caravan at West Bay, Dorset; 4 Nov 2008.

The pervasive structure here is the background pattern of the horizontal slats of the blind, each of which has its own internal, horizontal tonal gradation >>>  and then this dominant horizontal pattern is cut right through by the blind’s vertical chords. 

My eye enters the composition on the left, and then follows the horizontal slats towards the right, until the entire composition fades off  into darkness at the far right.  Although appearing at first sight just right for monochrome, this colour version works better.  Its amazing the things that one can see from a lavatory seat (can’t believe I wrote that when this post first went out, surprised it didn’t bring calls of “Don’t even go there!” but, really, that would entail quite a lifestyle change).

F6 with 70-300 Nikkor at 70mm; Fuji Provia 400X  colour slide, rated at 1600 ISO.
.
.
.

About Adrian Lewis
Photographer working in monochrome, colour and combinations of the two - with a great liking for all sorts of images, including Minimalism, landscapes, abstracts, soft colour, people, movement, nature - I like to be adventurous in my photography, trying new ideas and working in many genres. And I'm fond of Full English Breakfasts and Duvel golden ale, though not necessarily together.

20 Responses to ARCHIVE 97 – THE BLINDS ARE CLOSED

  1. Malin H says:

    Hahahaha… Thank you for sharing this little story. 😀

    Like

  2. Love the colour and painterly effect.

    Like

  3. Robert says:

    I love the way you take us on your journey of the image Adrian! My first thoughts were the blinds are closed, let’s settle in for a cosy night in 🙂

    >

    Like

    • Adrian Lewis says:

      I like to “go through” the image as I see it, Robert – explaining how I see things, I suppose. By the way, I sae on your blog that you’re a Neo Pagan; I am too – think I’ve mentioned this before. Don’t know if you’re interested in this sort of thing, but I’m reading a reasonably heavy but fascinating book entitled “Pagan Britain”, by Ronald Hutton, who is a Prof of History at Bristol Uni. Its an objective history of British Paganism by an expert. Adrian

      Like

      • Robert says:

        Thank you for the book tip Adrian, interestingly my interest in the ancient pagan world has recently been rekindled.

        Like

        • Adrian Lewis says:

          Glad that’s useful! As I get older, I’m finding that I’m less and less for “weird and wacky beliefs”, and so I value Hutton’s (very up to date) review of what is known about beliefs, ritual and Paganism from Palaeolithic times to the present. He looks at the facts, makes clear the various possible interpretations – and makes clear where we really don’t know. Of great interest to me are reviews of archaeological and belief (eg ley lines) developments and trends. A

          Like

          • Robert says:

            Yes I have had a similar experience; ageing brings with it a level of pragmatism I had not known before.

            Like

            • Adrian Lewis says:

              Maybe we’re becoming wise(!). And one thing’s for sure: the longer we live the more life experience we can bring to bear on any topic, issue or problem that we encounter.

              Let’s face it, I can believe in absolutely anything I like – but I’m increasingly coming to feel that any beliefs that I do have must have a very firm and deep seated foundation within myself, and this can spring from at least two scenarios.

              First, many potential beliefs will fall foul of my logical, scientific, analytical mind – I’ve spent my working life in science and analysis. And if there is something that I really don’t think likely, then I shy away from it. (And herein lies the value of Ronald Hutton’s ordered reviews of theories). I would absolutely LOVE to believe in all of the Glastonbury legends but, if I did, I think I would just be fooling myself – deep down, I simply don’t believe these stories. On the other hand, there are so many recorded instances of ghosts that they must reflect something, although I’ve no idea what that something (or somethings) is.

              But second there are things completely beyond my scientific and analytical ken, things that maybe I want or like to believe in. For instance, I’m very receptive to ideas about beings or spirits in trees – I’m sometimes a tree hugger, and I talk to and touch the trees in our garden with real feelings of friendship and meaningfulness. Similarly, I have deep feelings for and appreciation of Natural things, and the gods that I sometimes pray to are certainly not those of organised Western religion.

              Ha, I’ve rambled on – but I enjoy such contact with others – and maybe I’m also getting things straight in my own head! Are you still awake??? Adrian

              Like

              • Robert says:

                I’m wide awake and pleased that I have had the opportunity to learn more about you. In contrast to you I suppose I could be described as flaky. Feelings guide me through life, it has only been in the last four years that I’ve stopped fighting this approach. I have this inexplicable belief that everything will turn out okay – that’s all I need really. I started life as a Baptist, spent teenage years as a chorister in a C of E church and spent the next 30 years finding my way through a fog of contradictions. I now try my best to live in the present and not think too much about the future. I look forward to more chats. Robert

                Like

  4. … thanks for the early morning chuckle… 😀 !! Lovely photo, Adrian!!

    Liked by 1 person

This blog has two pleasures for me - creating the images and hearing from you - so get your thoughts out to the world!

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: