MENDIP HILLS 28 – LOOKING SOUTHEAST FROM EAST WATER LANE (MONO)

 

 

Looking southeast from East Water Lane
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Looking southeast from East Water Lane; 7 Aug 2014.

The eastern side of the lane, with a line of Hawthorns rising above a dry stone wall of the local limestone.  In the distance, trees line the road that continues on eastwards towards the Hunters Lodge Inn, Green Ore, and the main highway that runs down the Mendips’ steep southern slopes into the tiny city of Wells.

Back beyond the nearest tree, to its left, several other low trees are faintly seen out in the field.  The right hand end of this low copse was the setting for Magpie, barbed wire fence, and tree.

D800 with 12-24 Sigma at 12mm; 200 ISO; Silver Efex Pro 2, starting at the Cool Tones 1 preset.
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About Adrian Lewis
Photographer working in monochrome, colour and combinations of the two - with a great liking for all sorts of images, including Minimalism, landscapes, abstracts, soft colour, people, movement, nature - I like to be adventurous in my photography, trying new ideas and working in many genres. And I'm fond of Full English Breakfasts and Duvel golden ale, though not necessarily together.

18 Responses to MENDIP HILLS 28 – LOOKING SOUTHEAST FROM EAST WATER LANE (MONO)

  1. drawandshoot says:

    This is just gorgeous and magical, Adrian. I love your landscapes!

    Like

  2. LensScaper says:

    A bit like Infra-Red in some respects – very dream-like. A hot summer’s day type picture. Rather different from today – sitting here with a fleece and jumper on and refusing to put the heating on in August. Brrrr!

    Like

    • Adrian Lewis says:

      Yes, it was a warm day – not sure I can ever say hot up on top the Mendips! Oh yes, refusing the heating in August – I agree! – extra layers are the thing. Thanks for your thoughts, Andy! Adrian

      Like

  3. I love the shadows and the way it looks like you were in a moving vehicle when you took this shot. Great work, A. xxx ATP

    Like

    • Adrian Lewis says:

      Hi, Gem! I wondered what you meant about being in a moving vehicle but I think I’ve got it now – its to do, at least in part, with the splaying or streaking out of the tree’s leaves and branches at top left in the frame, isn’t it? – and you’re right, it does give an impression of speed. Its an effect of the extremely wide angle lens I used – its view of the world is so wide, that at the edges it often streaks and smears things out – bit like what you see when you’ve been at the SBJ!

      Thanks for your appreciation, ATP >>> I hope you all have a very good weekend! ATP xxx

      Like

  4. Emily Gooch says:

    Déjà vu! This image reminds me a dream I had… I don’t remember what the dream was about, but I remember walking down a path with trees and field similar to this. Hmm… wonder if this means I will travel to England someday. Well, if I do; I will make sure to look you up and we can go for a photo walk. 🙂

    Like

  5. krikitarts says:

    Once again we are in full agreement! I’ve learned several times over the value of not only saving “seconds” for a second chance at some time down the road, but also not discarding any that don’t appeal to me at all at first glance. As you’ve found with your beloved SEP and other programs, many an archived image can benefit greatly from a fresh look and some new processing. Some of them may well turn out to be true hidden treasures!

    Liked by 1 person

    • Adrian Lewis says:

      Absolutely right, Gary, absolutely right! And maybe the most important point you’ve made is not to discard any pictures at first glance – as the adverts for great bargains and sales say, “When they’re gone, they’re gone!”. I wish you a good weekend, my friend! Adrian

      Like

  6. paula graham says:

    Love it too, very evocative, mysterious, wonderful and ethereal atmosphere you created, Adrian.
    So simple and so strong..show us again that you do not have to go to the arctics and ruin the planet in the process, to create and take good photos.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Adrian Lewis says:

      Thank you indeed for these good words, Paula! Simplicity is an important thing. In general, simpler images are better – if there is too much clutter, the eye doesn’t know what to fasten onto. Here the eye fastens onto that nearest tree, which is looking us full in the face, and everything else in the shot is pale, supporting backdrop.

      And you’re right, there is no need to travel to faraway places to capture worthwhile photos, worthwhile images are all around. An important point, though, which I’ve learned through personal experience and other photographers’ input, is to leave digital images to “mature”, like fine wines, after a photographic sortie – not to try and go and them immediately.

      Leave them be a few days, a week, months, and you will return to them with a fresh eye and creativity, which will bring out unseen ideas and attributes. One source describes this as almost as if the “matured” images are the products of someone else’s ideas which you, with a fresh and different mind, are then developing to their full potential.

      Thank you for your thoughts. Adrian

      Like

  7. karijeppesen says:

    Oh, this is so, so beautiful, Adrian!! My thoughts goes for “Wuthering Heights” the Emily Brontë book that I love so much!!… (…smiling and smiling…)

    Like

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