GARDEN 47 – PLANTAIN (MONO)

 

 

Plantain in our Bristol garden

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Plantain from our Bristol garden; 22 June 2014.

Taking my life (and my plant guide) in my hands, I’m going to identify this as the Ribwort Plantain.  And this is the first denizen of our front garden that I’ve pictured.  Not that it was in the front garden when I pictured it.  Seeing these plantains – plants that I’ve always liked – beside our front gate, I held back The Destructor (our petrol mower) from roaring and ravaging over them and instead let it roar and ravage around them, so that I could preserve them and bring a bloom indoors.

And if this is indeed the Ribwort Plantain, my little book tells me that its one of the commonest European plants – and also that it grows in “grassy and waste places”, which describes our diminutive and scraggy front garden to a tee.

D800 with 105mm Nikkor; 100 ISO; tripod; Silver Efex Pro 2, starting at the Landscape preset.
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About Adrian Lewis
Photographer working in monochrome, colour and combinations of the two - with a great liking for all sorts of images, including Minimalism, landscapes, abstracts, soft colour, people, movement, nature - I like to be adventurous in my photography, trying new ideas and working in many genres. And I'm fond of Full English Breakfasts and Duvel golden ale, though not necessarily together.

18 Responses to GARDEN 47 – PLANTAIN (MONO)

  1. Sonali Dalal says:

    Have you got preset from somewhere else? This one is lovely too. Black background makes it look stunning.

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    • Adrian Lewis says:

      Yes, as I mentioned a moment ago in another of my answers to your Comments, this Landscape preset (and the Soft Orange one too) are from a preset set you can download from the internet after SEP2 is up and running.

      But NB that I never use the presets as they are, I use them as starting points, and then work on them using SEP2’s manual tools. The presets nearly always need some tweaking with the manual tools. Glad you like the shot – thanks! 🙂

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  2. Your words bring on a desire for a bouquet! They must surely dress up your garden. 😉
    xxx

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    • Adrian Lewis says:

      Well our garden is rarely a flowery place, but I like these plantains, and dandilions (do you have them over there?) are becoming a real favourite. Some things have to be controlled – brambles would engulf everything if not cut back – but other than these sorts of radical things I don’t see any plants as weeds, in fact I hate the concept of weeds – they’re all plants. Do you think I’m mellowing – or losing the plot???????????? 😀

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  3. Meanderer says:

    Ha, ha: yes! You also knew the name this time last year when you commented on my photo of them: https://thelanternroom.wordpress.com/2013/06/02/conical-perennial/

    I love them and am disappointed that they don’t grow in our garden. I used to enjoy seeing them on the grassy verge outside someone’s house until a group of ‘landscapers’ chopped the whole lot down! These plants need to be appreciated more!

    Lovely image. I like the way you have isolated it from a distracting background. It works brilliantly in monochrome.

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    • Adrian Lewis says:

      Well I’ll be blowed (which, although fine in Merrie England, is apparently not something to be uttered in polite circles Stateside …), I’d completely forgotten that post and my past botanical acumen too! Great stuff!!!

      LenScaper (below here) says that they’re very tenacious plants, once you’ve got them you can’t get rid of them, so it sounds like they’re hardy >>> so if you were to see some you could bring one home, sort of botanical fostering y’follow, and then let it loose on your greensward, and I could get you a B&Q flamethrower for Christmas.

      I’m glad you like the picture. But, as I say, its not actually taken in the front “garden” – I removed a bloom and brought it into the house – so its a put up job – and the black and featureless background is in fact a towel hanging over the back of a chair. I’m not hugely enamoured with this sort of photography, I often foul it up, but I do like the black and white Minimalism.

      Thanks again. Adrian

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  4. I love this image – so simple and elegant, and I never knew their proper name 🙂

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    • Adrian Lewis says:

      I’m pleased you like it, Lisa – thank you! Minimalism!

      I rarely know plants’ names. But I seem to remember that there are also much larger plantains – I’m sure we used to cook and eat them in Kenya – they were rather like bananas >>> unless of course, bananas are plantains ….. A … ???????

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  5. LensScaper says:

    Absolutely correct, Adrian! And perfectly photographed. Just don’t let it get into any grass that you actually like – a nightmare to get rid of.

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    • Adrian Lewis says:

      Andy, thank you very much for those good words – I’m grateful – and relieved! 🙂 Grass I care about? Well, you know, my attitude to gardening is very laissez faire aka lazy aka liking things to be reasonably natural.

      And that translates into using The Destructor (our apocalyptic petrol mower) to keep the rough “lawns” more or less to heel, and then using two pairs of cutters to prune the wonderful trees and to fight off the ever encroaching brambles.

      I suppose my greatest outpouring of horticultural tenderness(!) has been to successfully encourage the grove of Cowslips by letting them go totally to seed before letting The Destructor loose on them – and they’re spreading all over the place, which is just wonderful.

      Out beyond our back fence is rapidly turning to jungle, with all sorts of wildlife, including the occasional deer. Early this morning, a Vixen and her two (quite well grown) cubs were playing just below our kitchen window.

      Thank you again. Adrian

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      • LensScaper says:

        We too have an area down the bottom of our garden that has primroses, bluebells, cowslips and speedwells that we allow to grow right through spring and the reward of that has been that all those semi-wild flowers have spread quite dramatically over the years. The petrol mower then has to scythe this down – a task it completes with a considerable amount of complaint and blue smoke.

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        • Adrian Lewis says:

          That sounds just like our cowslip patch – we have a few bluebells, and I think we may have speedwells too – for me these wildflowers mean a lot more than non-wild ones. And while we’re waxing horticultural (or is it arable?), I’m thinking of a petrol strimmer too – how vicious can I get??? 🙂

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