BRISTOL 72 – SCAFFOLDING, NETTING AND THE RULE OF THIRDS

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Scaffolding pole and safety netting, sunlit, at the top of Lodge Street, in central Bristol; 15 Apr 2014.

The building at the top of Lodge Street is having work down on it, and so is festooned with scaffolding – which has the usual red and white covering, to stop people accidentally walking into it.  And because the workmen are directly above this busy street, the whole of the scaffolding structure is cocooned in orange safety netting, to stop any dropped tools and so on falling onto passers by below.

Lodge Street is steep and narrow, one of Bristol’s old streets, and as I panted my way up to the top, bright sunlight was bathing the scaffolding and its netting cocoon.  Because it was taller than the structure, the netting had a horizontal tuck or roll to make it the correct length, and I photographed the intersection of this tuck with one of the scaffolding poles.

This picture uses three simple visual devices.  First, the pole is a diagonal across the frame, from corner to corner; and second, because we Westerners view images from left to right, the pole starts high on the left and our eyes follow it easily down to the right.  Finally, following the Rule of Thirds, the intersection of the pole and the tuck is sited at a visual strongpoint within the composition, approximately at the intersection of the image’s left and upper thirds.

And for those of you new to photography who think that such “rules” are the way forward – don’t use them all the time, or your pictures will all look the same, they will become awfully predictable.  Rather, such “rules” are things to keep in mind, things to be aware of, but never to be used slavishly.

Dark railings and a pale strip of pavement are dimly visible through the netting.  The pavement here is set up above the road, and the railings prevent pedestrians from damaging passing traffic by falling on it.

There is another and very different image from Lodge Street here.

Canon G11 PowerShot at 140mm (35mm equivalent); 100 ISO.
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About Adrian Lewis
Photographer working in monochrome, colour and combinations of the two - with a great liking for all sorts of images, including Minimalism, landscapes, abstracts, soft colour, people, movement, nature - I like to be adventurous in my photography, trying new ideas and working in many genres. And I'm fond of Full English Breakfasts and Duvel golden ale, though not necessarily together.

25 Responses to BRISTOL 72 – SCAFFOLDING, NETTING AND THE RULE OF THIRDS

  1. Sallyann says:

    Rules are there to be broken. 🙂
    Saying that, although my eyes followed the horizontal bar from left to right, I found myself following from the bottom right corner up into the picture.
    Do you suppose this is because I don’t read much, or often. 🙂

    Like

    • Adrian Lewis says:

      Yes, there to be broken – who’d even think about trying to enforce rules on you???

      And, yes, I’m sure you’re right. If I were you I’d read up, or perhaps down, about it …. 🙂 …

      And so what do you do, I mean when you come to the words “much” or “often” … just skip over them … ? …

      Like

      • Sallyann says:

        I avoid words as much as possible, it’s surprisingly easy to do when you’ve practiced as long as I have. 🙂
        If I do have to read though, I read very slowly, just one word at a time, and even then I quite often find I’ve read something completely different to everyone else.
        The stories in my world just make themselves up as they go along. 😀

        Like

        • Adrian Lewis says:

          The world is an interesting place, Hallysann. Each and every one of us is if great interest, and I’m fascinated by what you have said, and also grateful that you should choose to share such things. Adrian

          Like

          • Sallyann says:

            Thanks, I guess you see now why I’ve not read the camera manual yet. 😀

            Like

            • Adrian Lewis says:

              Yes, I certainly do >>> but isn’t this one of the things hubbies are for? (said he, shamelessly betraying his kind …) Threaten him with something basic … not getting fed will most probably do .. until he finds out how to activate your camera’s stabilisation! 🙂

              Like

              • Sallyann says:

                Forgive me for laughing out loud, but Hubby’s just broken the charger on his new phone by stuffing it into the socket upside down. No, I’m afraid it’s me and the manual to battle this one out between us. 🙂

                Like

                • Adrian Lewis says:

                  Oh dear! Well, OK, another idea – send me the make and model number for your camera, and I’ll see if I can find out where stabilisation is – tho I have no idea if this is possible – but I’ll try!!! 🙂

                  Like

                  • Sallyann says:

                    I DID IT !!! 🙂
                    I now have continuous image stabilization activated on my camera.
                    Manual 0 – 1 Me. 🙂
                    I may have won the battle this time, but now I have to go and re-group ready for the next charge. 😀

                    Like

                    • Adrian Lewis says:

                      YAAAYYYYY!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! GREAT STUFF!!!!

                      Now, remember, the stabilisation won’t help at all with subjects that are moving, they’ll still be blurred if you use low shutter speeds.

                      BUT, the stabilisation ought to considerably help in the reducing of the blurring in your photos due to you shaking the camera. One example – if you want to set a smaller aperture eg F16 rather than F8 to increase depth of the field, then your shutter speed will be lower but that may now be OK now that stabilisation is on.

                      Yes, you have won a battle – and if you can do it once you can do it again! I repeat – great stuff!!! Adrian 🙂

                      Like

  2. Meanderer says:

    I never knew scaffolding could be so interesting! I like it – especially those strong intersecting poles. Reminds me of rigging on a boat.

    Like

    • Adrian Lewis says:

      My view is that anything can be visually interesting – and especially so if we listen to right-brainers >>> and even more so if the light is offering a helping hand! 🙂 Glad you like it, my friend – thank you! A

      Like

  3. This is a very effective illustration of the rule of thirds, but the reason I really like it are the subtle things – the light patches and shadowed crease lines pulling away from the gather, with the added lines of the railings and the pavement add depth and interest for me.

    Like

    • Adrian Lewis says:

      Yes, I agree, its an image with two levels. The pole and the gather blaze brazenly out in the sunshine but, as you say, there are subtler things too – staring into the camera’s screen on that bright sunny day (screens simply aren’t up to it on sunny days!), I’m not at all sure I appreciated all of these subtleties at the time – they are partly serendipitous! Thanks for your thoughts and appreciation, JP! Adrian

      Like

  4. krikitarts says:

    What an interesting combination of elements! The almost-subliminal railing and pavement add a lot of interest, and I particularly like the ghostly sunlit stones.

    Like

  5. LensScaper says:

    I would like to think that my ‘Eye’ would have spotted this, but I’m not sure it would. This is a superb find, Adrian. You’ve critiqued it well too – spot on.

    Like

  6. RobynG says:

    Awesome sighting and capture Adrian! I love the composition! Have a wonderful week!

    Like

  7. lauramacky says:

    nicely seen!

    Like

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