SOMERSET LEVELS 144 – OPEN COUNTRY

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Jack’s Drove arrowing northwards across Tealham Moor, heading towards Wedmore; 10 Apr 2014.

This appears to be a fatuous title for this post – “its open country but its closed” –  but although the “non-open” sign is so prominently there, this isn’t what I’m getting at.  A quarter of a century ago and more, I spent a long time in Kenya, and gloried in that country’s vast open spaces and equally vast, open skies.

I’m no longer in such incredible wildernesses, but the next best – and relatively local – thing for me is standing out on the Somerset Levels, on the Tadham and Tealham Moors to be exact, to revel in their flat openness – and in the towering skies above them.  Deep within myself, I’m certainly a creature of flatlands, far preferring them to woods, forest, hills and mountains.  Being brought up amongst these Levels is probably a factor.

This picture, its true, gives rather a false impression because its taken with quite a seriously wide angle lens.  This makes the place look huge and vast.  And because light mist is shrouding the low hills in the distance, just take away the road sign and this might just be some desolate savannah grassland in more tropical climes.

And so >>> “Open country”.

D700 with 16-35 Nikkor at 17mm; 400 ISO.
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About Adrian Lewis
Photographer working in monochrome, colour and combinations of the two - with a great liking for all sorts of images, including Minimalism, landscapes, abstracts, soft colour, people, movement, nature - I like to be adventurous in my photography, trying new ideas and working in many genres. And I'm fond of Full English Breakfasts and Duvel golden ale, though not necessarily together.

16 Responses to SOMERSET LEVELS 144 – OPEN COUNTRY

  1. krikitarts says:

    That sign wouldn’t stop me. I’m happy to learn that it didn’t stop you either!

    Like

  2. Meanderer says:

    Did you ignore the sign and travel a little way?

    I do like open land or waterscapes. Big views, big skies, big wide horizons. I like to feel as if I am a small part of the whole – it clears the cobwebs in the mind. It’s why I like escaping to the sea. I also like rolling hills – such as our nearby landscape here, and the Yorkshire Dales and so on. Open woodland is lovely too. I’m not very keen on enclosed space so don’t enjoy walking through dark forests.

    Like

    • Adrian Lewis says:

      Yes, I went up to the bridge over the North Drain and could see the road clear ahead up to where it starts to rise into the Wedmore “highlands” – it must be closed up there somewhere, in the narrow, winding country lanes.

      I didn’t know you escape to the sea, you mysterious and interesting person! Feeling a small part of the whole, I know what you mean. And I agree about enclosed spaces – I used to go caving, but I get claustrophobic twinges above ground these days!

      Like

  3. Sallyann says:

    I was brought up near pebbles and railings, I’m often drawn to one or the other now but finding the two together will very often make my day. 🙂

    Like

  4. LensScaper says:

    An eloquent image and writing, Adrian. Memory is a powerful thing. There is a certain smell I encounter in a pine wood that transports me instantly back to the forests of Nepal. Memory can be triggered by many things often seemingly minor associations that stretch back across the years.

    Like

    • Adrian Lewis says:

      Thank you, Andy, I’m glad it gets to you! And I agree with – and identify with – 100% of what you’re saying about memory – absolutely. Ten years ago or so, my old secondary school was going to be demolished, and former pupils were given the chance for a final look around.

      This was around 35 years after I’d quit the place forever – and yet the smell of the gymnasium (I always hated PE, despite being a rugby player) was just as in my school days – and it brought the whole place – the whole school, not just the gym – back to life. It was just as if someone had pressed a light switch, and suddenly I was a schoolboy once again.

      Like

  5. Helen Cherry says:

    You’d enjoy the fens then Adrian.. as flat as a pancake and more sky than you can shake a stick at !! but not enough trees for my liking !!

    Like

    • Adrian Lewis says:

      I’ve been over your way a bit, birdwatching in days past. I remember seeing Dotterel at Fulbourn, near Cambridge, in 1974, and then Golden Orioles much more recently, near Lakenheath. in Suffolk. All lovely parts of the world – and I’ve been more often in north Norfolk too – I could easily live in Suffolk or Norfolk.

      Like

  6. Wonderful description/explanation! Writing the ‘why’ is something I really struggle with and wish I was as elaquent as you! Thanks for sharing, xs

    Like

    • Adrian Lewis says:

      Sophie, thank you very much for your kind words! But have hope! >>> long ago I used to really struggle with words and “the why” too, but a working life (and leisure interests) full of reports and description has made me fluent – to some extent at least its a matter of practice.

      I admire your art, and I’m pleased you like this image – thanks!

      I wrote something about “Why” awhile back – in case its any use to you, I’ll look out the link, and put it into another reply to your comment. Adrian

      Like

    • Adrian Lewis says:

      Hi again, Sophie, here’s that link – http://wp.me/p1wq8h-60l

      I hope it works! I’ve done some posts for novice photographers, and this one talks about being able to articulate our thoughts re images – likes, dislikes, indifference (the last the most terrible thing!). I hope this is of some use. Adrian

      Like

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