SOMERSET LEVELS 138 – WATER GATE (MONO)

mm
.

.
Water gate on a small water-filled ditch, or rhyne, on Tealham Moor; 29 Aug 2013.

The rhyne is the slightly pale, waterweed-covered entity passing under the gate.  It doesn’t really look like water at all.  And to the right the much more obviously watery (and similarly manmade) North Drain makes off, straight as a die, into the distance.

Trying to explain how this gate works would be hopeless from this angle, so please see the image below.  And, a caveat – for all I know it may not be known as a water gate – anyone know its real name?

D700 with 12-24 Sigma at 12mm; 200 ISO; Silver Efex Pro 2, starting at the Dramatic preset.
.
.

hovm_043X
.
A side view of this gate, along with the FATmanMobile.  This picture was taken long after the mono shot above, and following the exceptionally heavy rainfall this area received in the interim, the little rhyne is now mostly open water.

And the small gate in this device is wound up, so that it is keeping the water level in the rhyne slightly above that in the right foreground, which is the level of the water in the North Drain.

If, using the large teeth visible on its sides, the gate is wound down, i.e. towards us, the water in the rhyne will start to flow out until, eventually, the level of the water in the rhyne will be the same as that in the Drain.

Winding the gate the other way will cause the gate to rise, so that the water level in the rhyne will be able to rise still higher if there is more rain or some other inflow to the ditch.
.
.
.

About Adrian Lewis
Photographer working in monochrome, colour and combinations of the two - with a great liking for all sorts of images, including Minimalism, landscapes, abstracts, soft colour, people, movement, nature - I like to be adventurous in my photography, trying new ideas and working in many genres. And I'm fond of Full English Breakfasts and Duvel golden ale, though not necessarily together.

19 Responses to SOMERSET LEVELS 138 – WATER GATE (MONO)

  1. bananabatman says:

    Although it is a somewhat different mechanism to a traditional ‘sluice gate’ Adrian, I would have thought that it is a variety of one. I’m probably wrong, but that’s what I would have called it. I see from Wikipedia ( http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sluice#cite_note-4 ), that on the levels sluice gates are called ‘clyse’ or ‘clyce’. I suspect that you knew that all along. 🙂

    Like

    • Adrian Lewis says:

      It may be a sluice, Dave, my knowledge is scanty here. The clyses that I’ve heard of on the Levels (and there may well be others I haven’t heard of) are built to stop seawater flowing up the rivers, while also allowing the rivers’ freshwater to flow out.

      So these clyses have gates which are pressed shut when the incoming tide presses up against them, so arresting its progress – but when the tide recedes, the gates are pressed open by the weight of freshwater building up behind them, so allowing the freshwater to flow away.

      I don’t know, is the bottom line – but thanks for your thoughts! I hope you’re both well! Adrian

      Like

      • bananabatman says:

        I knew you were an expert on ‘the levels’ Adrian. I needed to look at Wikipedia to have any idea, though I would have suggested ‘sluices’. I have enjoyed trying to catch up with your recent ‘levels’ related posts.

        We are well, as I hope you are also, but my feet rarely seem to touch the ground at the moment. spring jobs, holidays and visiting friends are keeping me away from the PC somewhat.

        Like

        • Adrian Lewis says:

          Well, everyone will still be here when you start posting again, we’re not going anywhere! Not sure I’m expert, though!

          I’m ok, thank you! Into my second year of retirement, and certainly valuing and enjoying the experience. A

          Like

  2. Nice 🙂 Great balance in the image – I like the cold hard shiny metal against the wildness of grass, the leading lines into that sky, and as you know, I’m rather fond of wide angle lenses!

    Like

    • Adrian Lewis says:

      I’m pleased you like it, Lisa. I don’t know whether you use a full frame camera or not, but if you do then I wholeheartedly recommend the Sigma 12-24 lens. I’m using the initial version, but there’s a Mark 2 out now. Using a 1.5 crop lens e.g. Nikon’s DX format, produces 18mm at this zoom’s wider end. Adrian

      Like

  3. Malin H says:

    Oh yes, I can see the FATmanMobile 😉
    I really like the dramatic feeling in the b&w!

    Like

    • Adrian Lewis says:

      The FatManMobile is disreputable by conventional UK standards – because I’m often out in the country, it is usually adorned with mud, dust and other unmentionable substances, and it has lichen growing on it, and resident spiders with their cobwebs too. Our neighbour was so outraged that it was in such a state – and he is such a kind chap too – that when my car was in his garage for repairs, he had it cleaned, inside and out!

      Glad you like the mono image. The 12-24 lens I use is really something, especially at its 12mm end – it produces such drama. Thank you for your thoughts! A 🙂

      Like

  4. RobynG says:

    I love the dramatization of the black and white image Adrian!

    Like

  5. krikitarts says:

    Thanks for including the second shot of the side view with the venerable FMmobile. It really helps to showcase the amount of artistic thought you put into the object’s transformation into the stark and sinister, yet intriguing upper image. Your rendering of the cloudy sky adds a good deal of drama, and your vignetting really works to its overall advantage. Also, as if to reinforce the obvious, dramatic trapezoid that is the main element, the two wooden fences flanking its far end further draw my eyes toward the distant perspective terminus. Well worth a walk on a windy day.

    Like

    • Adrian Lewis says:

      Thanks for these good words, Gary. Its always good to get others’ perspectives and input. For example, here, I hadn’t thought about the lower shot showing the “realism baseline” from which the mono evolved, but that’s a good point. The camera never lies??? Maybe mine often do… 😉 ….

      And I hadn’t noticed the converging fences beyond the metal structure – thanks for pointing them out!

      Thanks again for some thoughtful and useful points. Adrian

      Like

  6. What is that about the mother of invention?
    Interesting.
    I see my purple flowers. 🙂 xxx

    Like

    • Adrian Lewis says:

      Having just awoken from postprandial dozing, I had to think what you’re talking about, but its all clear now. Yes, your flowers, only just still there – and I did like that grove of crocuses! And learning how to live with water – that’s what’s happened on the Levels – except there’s been far, far too much water this year. A xxx

      Like

  7. John says:

    I would call this a Dam. A nice little dam it is. I would like to know more about this control system.

    Like

    • Adrian Lewis says:

      I’ll go with dam, John, you could be right – thanks! A broad intro to the area, including summary bits on water management, is given in the first of my Somerset Levels posts – I hope you can reach it via this link – http://wp.me/p1wq8h-iE

      If this link fails, then use the Categories drop down list in the sidebar to the right here and select “Somerset Levels”. Thank you for your input. Adrian

      Like

This blog has two pleasures for me - creating the images and hearing from you - so get your thoughts out to the world!

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: