BIRDS 52 – JAY 2 (MONO)

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Jay on the upper Oak in our back garden; 6 Mar 2014.

I like the combination of the sleek and beautiful bird set amongst the winter Oak’s rough and tangled branches.  And how I love these birds, well, I suppose such feelings extend to vast numbers of natural things really.  But how, for example, I would love to have a Jay perching – garrulous, exactly in character with its scientific name – on my shoulder.  And to have it uttering its harsh swearing calls – always far too loudly –  in my ear!

I’m not happy with the twig that enters the frame from the right and, although not in the same plane, appears to “kiss” the tip of this bird’s beak.  No doubt it could be expunged by software dexterity, but I’m not sure my skills are at that level, and in any case I’m loath to spend time on it.

The first Jay photo, and more context, can be found here.

D800 with 70-300 Nikkor at 300mm; 800 ISO; Silver Efex Pro 2, starting at the Classic Portrait preset, and with a light copper tone.

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About Adrian Lewis
Photographer working in monochrome, colour and combinations of the two - with a great liking for all sorts of images, including Minimalism, landscapes, abstracts, soft colour, people, movement, nature - I like to be adventurous in my photography, trying new ideas and working in many genres. And I'm fond of Full English Breakfasts and Duvel golden ale, though not necessarily together.

22 Responses to BIRDS 52 – JAY 2 (MONO)

  1. krikitarts says:

    I don’t think I’ve ever seen one of your jays before–so different in coloration from our ubiquitous Blues and the Canada jays to our north, though the striking blue & black wing and tail feathers hint at a distant relation. Ours are also shameless robbers and much less shy, and they not only steal other birds’ eggs, but I’ve also seen them viciously attacking their fledgeling young as well. But yes, they are unmistakeably, magnificently beautiful, whatever else they may be!

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    • Adrian Lewis says:

      Yes, that’s it, our Jay is only Eurasian I think, not in the New World. But our’s kill nestlings too – great opportunists. I know what you mean when you say “whatever else they may be” – but what they do, they do well – and who are we to judge? – knowing you as I do, I’m sure you think the same as me here. Thanks for your thoughts, my friend! Adrian

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  2. What a beauty! I miss Jays, well actually I miss a lot of birds from the UK so I now subscribe to Tweet of the Day on a Radio 4 podcast where they play a different bird song every day – today was a Willow Warbler. Like the copper toning too 🙂

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    • Adrian Lewis says:

      Glad you like it, Lisa! I’m increasingly attracted to copper toning – one of the more useful tones SEP2 serves up.

      And what a good idea from Radio 4. I know just what you mean about missing UK birds. I spent quite a time in Kenya and, towards the end of that, I was aching for the sight of things like Blackbirds and Robins. I remember Scottish friends bringing back photos of the Hebrides – and I excitedly asked them “And were there things like Blackbirds around too?”. A

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  3. Meanderer says:

    Beautiful image, Adrian, which works so well in mono. I share your love of these birds. When you posted the colour version I said I didn’t think I’d seen a jay. I have since been fortunate to see one flying low between trees not too far from me. What a treat.

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    • Adrian Lewis says:

      I’m pleased you like the shot, my friend. Although they’re colourful birds, I think this works well in mono – the tone helps I think.

      Two things to help you see them. First the loud, harsh, scolding, swearing calls, which are distinctly different from the “caws” of ordinary crows.

      And then Jays have broad and very rounded wings, and they clumsily flop around the sky, heavily lumbering here and there, again in a quite different way to the more aerobatic, more ordinary crows. Thanks again. A

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  4. I see what you’re saying about the twig. If you had just stood a smidge to the right but whatever. Pretty bird. Jay is what I call my son, Joe, so that has special meaning to me.
    xxx

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    • Adrian Lewis says:

      Yes, you’re right, if I’d been a little to the right – but I was concentrating on the bird which was hopping around haphazardly, and so the backdrop was below my event horizon, whatever that is … – I guess I’m just happy to have pictured the bird. 🙂

      I’m really very pleased that Jay has special meaning for you >>> to lapse in Brit vernacular, “Great stuff!!!”!!! 🙂

      And as I’ve been saying to Carrie (see comments on the dying trees post) – who is another ATP’er and a geologist to boot, I’ve been getting more interested in geology again recently, and am thinking of teaching a short geology course to the retirees organisation I’ve got tangled up with recently. Strange how this interest has come back to me.

      I hope you’re fine as fine wine, Gem, and that your mum is too. A xxx

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  5. Dave says:

    I’ve never seen a jay like yours. Very striking. We have a jay up here that our villagers call “camp robbers” and back in Texas we had our blue jays, but the markings are so striking on this one.

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    • Adrian Lewis says:

      Hi, Dave! I think our Jay is only found in Eurasia, not the Americas. Its a member of the Crow family – are your jays crows too? Our Jays are “villainous” opportunists and robbers, taking other birds’ eggs and so on, but they’re distinctly wary of humans, which is why I was so happy to get these shots. Glad you admire the bird – thanks for your thoughts! Adrian

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  6. juliecrombe says:

    Beautiful, sharp shot!

    Like

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