SOMERSET LEVELS 130a – SWANS OVER TEALHAM – SUGGESTIONS FROM HENRIETTA RICHER AND DAVE BATTARBEE

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I recently posted colour and mono versions of a picture of Mute Swans over floods on Tealham Moor – and asked for thoughts and views.

Henrietta Richer and Dave Battarbee have both made suggestions, which I’ve incorporated in the image below – and which I think an improvement of the first version.  Henrietta suggested that I remove the black line of grasses from the bottom of the frame – and I’ve cropped out both that, and the small islands of similar grasses a little higher up in the frame.  And Dave thought I had too much sky above the birds, so I’ve reduced this too.  Thoughts?
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And here is a third and final version, inspired by some of Dave Batterbee’s Comment and some thoughts of my own – I’m most satisfied with this one.

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About Adrian Lewis
Photographer working in monochrome, colour and combinations of the two - with a great liking for all sorts of images, including Minimalism, landscapes, abstracts, soft colour, people, movement, nature - I like to be adventurous in my photography, trying new ideas and working in many genres. And I'm fond of Full English Breakfasts and Duvel golden ale, though not necessarily together.

19 Responses to SOMERSET LEVELS 130a – SWANS OVER TEALHAM – SUGGESTIONS FROM HENRIETTA RICHER AND DAVE BATTARBEE

  1. Malin H says:

    I agree with Henrietta and Dave – the third one is the best one. If you ask me. 🙂

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  2. Sonali Dalal says:

    Somehow I like the 2nd one. Though i do agree that large water body does add more meaning to the birds flying above.So by that viewpoint 3rd one is best. But somehow my eyes go back to 2nd one only.

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  3. Meanderer says:

    I like the third version – those grasses are important for the shot. Interestingly, I clicked on all three images and the second image loaded into full-screen on my laptop. It looks so beautiful that size with all the detail; heavenly.

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    • Adrian Lewis says:

      Oh, thanks, M – yes I agree, the third one is the one. I may have forgotten to reduce the quality of the second one before posting it – too much blood in my alcohol stream again … 🙂 … hic! … would you like a full quality jpeg of the 3rd version??? Lemme know!!!

      A Tesco cashier referred to Duvel as a lager today – doesn’t anyone have any standards any more??????????????????????????????????????

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      • Meanderer says:

        Yes please! That would be wonderful!

        Did you re-educate the cashier? 😉

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        • Adrian Lewis says:

          Right, I’ll get onto it in a moment. As for the cashier, a staccato burst of rabid Rab C Nesbitt did cross my mind but, thinking that she might not come to work equipped with a change of undies, I eased off. 😉

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          • Meanderer says:

            Sounds wise 😉

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            • Adrian Lewis says:

              How dare you accuse me of that! Uh, the effrontery!

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              • Meanderer says:

                Sorry 🙂 ‘Effrontery’: that’s a word I don’t think I’ve ever said or typed before! I shall try and use it at work tomorrow – preferably directed at one of my ‘bosses’ 😉

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                • Adrian Lewis says:

                  I love the quotes around bosses – oh you naughty blogger you! 🙂 🙂 🙂

                  I don’t use the word effrontery either, but its a word I remember being often used by a, shall we say, certainly eccentric, English teacher at my secondary school. I always recall getting a 1 in GCE English Literature – by the simple expedient of reading the damned books so many times I could recite them backwards if necessary. And, on being told that I was firmly headed for sciences in the 6th form, this master sorrowfully intoned “A great loss …”. Ah, halcyon days … and there was still honey for tea … 😉

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                  • Meanderer says:

                    🙂 How wonderful that we remember those truly good and characterful teachers. Gosh – it has just brought back memories of some of my old school reports. Just as well I don’t have them anymore – simply the memory of some fascinating comments! I was an awful – and often difficult and misunderstood – pupil – a round peg in a square hole, just as I am in the world of work 😉

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                    • Adrian Lewis says:

                      I’ve still got my school report book – the first couple of years were a wash out as I was (and am) short-sighted but hated the thought of wearing specs, and so couldn’t see the blackboard and so had little idea about anything. Then I got glasses (a la Manfred Mann – remember him?) and things got better.

                      We nicknamed our headmaster Bimbo, and his study stank of sherry. I seem to remember he was a magistrate.

                      And that last sentence of your’s – no!, never!!, not in a million years!!! …….. say, can you lend me some cash? … just asking …. 🙂 ….

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  4. bananabatman says:

    Hi Adrian. Thanks for the link to my blog. I appreciate it.

    More thoughts, for what they are worth (sorry). Loosing some sky works for me, but I still prefer to have the foreground grasses in the frame. Without the foreground the focus comes more onto the swans, but, to me, they become disconnected from their environment. The leading swan appears to be about to land and I liked to see where. This isn’t as apparent with the foreground cropped out. If the objection to the line of grass was its darkness, how would it be with this lightened somewhat? The original B&W image had slightly less foreground and didn’t seem quite as ‘dense’. Maybe take a little off the colour image as well, but leave some of the grass.

    Just my opinion Adrian. Dave.

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