PEOPLE 156 – LOOKING INTO A TABLET … AND A MOMENT OF MAGIC (MONO)

mmm
.

.
Mother and daughter gaze into a tablet computer; 24 Jan 2014.

D700 with 105mm Nikkor; 3200 ISO; Silver Efex Pro 2’s Warm Tone Paper preset.

A MOMENT OF MAGIC

We popped over to see our friends and their two wonderful daughters last week.  As usual, I completely let myself go with the two girls, and we went through all sorts of stuff and nonsense.  In common with other parents here, my friends have something called the Thinking Step which, one of the bottom steps of their stairs, is where the girls are sent to sit and think over their behaviour when it oversteps the mark.

And, old friends that we are, when my behaviour became too boisterous, the girls’ mother condemned me to the Thinking Step, and the two girls took me out into the hall, to show me where it is.

And then the moment of magic happened.  As I sat there, the four year old looked at me seriously, went upstairs, and returned with one of her dolls – which she sat on the Step beside me, so that I wouldn’t be lonely sitting there on my own.

I have to say that I was immensely touched by the kindness and simplicity of what she had done – for there, in microcosm, was one of the things that make Life lift and soar, one of the truly great things of this world.
.
.
.

About Adrian Lewis
Photographer working in monochrome, colour and combinations of the two - with a great liking for all sorts of images, including Minimalism, landscapes, abstracts, soft colour, people, movement, nature - I like to be adventurous in my photography, trying new ideas and working in many genres. And I'm fond of Full English Breakfasts and Duvel golden ale, though not necessarily together.

21 Responses to PEOPLE 156 – LOOKING INTO A TABLET … AND A MOMENT OF MAGIC (MONO)

  1. Malin H says:

    I smile when I’m reading this…
    Thank you Adrian for such a lovely story. 🙂

    And great image too, of course.

    Like

  2. Sonali Dalal says:

    What a wonderful moment it must have been for you! I think we elders also need thinking step sometimes!

    Lovely light here!

    Like

  3. Sallyann says:

    It’s magic indeed to catch a glimpse into a child’s mind. 🙂
    I almost didn’t make it through childbirth on my youngest daughter. Eldest and Middle daughters were just three and four but Hubby took the decision to include them in everything.
    Whilst explaining to them that Mummy was very sick in hospital and might die, Middle daughter put her arm around Hubby’s shoulder and said “never mind Daddy, we’ll get you another Mummy”.

    Like

    • Adrian Lewis says:

      That’s a really beautiful story, Sallyann – thanks very much indeed for sharing it. I imagine that the struggles and perils of that last birth have left you with a rather different take on the world. Good to hear from you! Adrian

      Like

      • Sallyann says:

        Sort of, but instead of a different take on the world, it’s more of a different me to take on the world. Apparently being on a ventitator changes your personality. The machine pumps in and out just the right amount of oxygen needed for a brain belonging to Mr, or Mrs, average. Since there is no such person there is no perfect amount of oxygen and it’s the variation of the oxygen level which changes the personality. The bigger the variation, the bigger the change. It’s taken a long while to get used to being me again, but I’ve been the new me now for almost as long as the old me was around. 🙂

        Like

  4. krikitarts says:

    There is nothing that can compare with a child’s sharing of a very special treasure with one of us elders. I can’t think of anything that helps to restore and recharge the resident remnant of youth in us.

    Like

  5. Four year old? Doesn’t surprise me. At that age, they work magic. Very sweet and touching, Adrian.

    Like

  6. Beautiful image and such a sweet story. Kindness in action. 🙂

    Like

    • Adrian Lewis says:

      Thanks, Ashley! I love small kids, I’ve only to hear their voices to feel enlivened and uplifted. I love hearing how they see things and what they think. Its an age of innocence and wonder, although it lasts for too short a time, and the more so with the pressures of growing up in today’s rushed and material world. Thank you again. Adrian 🙂

      Like

  7. Sue Vincent says:

    Oh that’s beautiful 🙂

    Like

This blog has two pleasures for me - creating the images and hearing from you - so get your thoughts out to the world!

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: