SOMERSET LEVELS 123 – FATman WITH A FISHEYE (MONO)

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FATman with a fisheye on Tadham Moor; 11 Dec 2013.

The tall, dark but not handsome shadow lower left is me, taking this photo with a full-frame fisheye, which has a 180 degree field of view across the diagonal.  I’m tilting this wild lens slightly downwards, and so the horizon is slightly bowed upwards.

I’m standing at a small crossroads that I know very well and love very much.  To the left, out of view, is the Magic Carpark.  Straight on is Totney Drove, which rolls on westwards towards Rattling Bow and Westham.  And to the right is Jack’s Drove, which I often mention, making off northwards towards Tealham Moor.  Jack’s Drove is flanked by one of the water-filled ditches, the rhynes (rhymes with “scenes”), that are the field boundaries in this very damp area, and pale lengths of corrugated iron have been built into the rhyne’s bank to (try to!) prevent the road from collapsing into the waterway.

Up from my shadow is a large, dark Willow (the largest tree in the frame), and in front of this is a pale Willow stump – which is the subject this other post.

D700 with Sigma 15mm fisheye; 200 ISO; Silver Efex Pro 2’s Triste2 preset.
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About Adrian Lewis
Photographer working in monochrome, colour and combinations of the two - with a great liking for all sorts of images, including Minimalism, landscapes, abstracts, soft colour, people, movement, nature - I like to be adventurous in my photography, trying new ideas and working in many genres. And I'm fond of Full English Breakfasts and Duvel golden ale, though not necessarily together.

32 Responses to SOMERSET LEVELS 123 – FATman WITH A FISHEYE (MONO)

  1. Sonali Dalal says:

    I didn’t know shadow can be handsome too 🙂 🙂 !

    Wonderful image, I must say! I like the way you experiment !

    Like

    • Adrian Lewis says:

      You didn’t know a shadow can be handsome too? >>> I bet you say that to all the photographers!!! 😉

      Thank you for your kind words, Sonali. For me, experimenting is the thing – always trying to look at things differently, always trying to stay mobile rather than in the same place – and blogging is the ideal medium for seeing what others think about these new efforts. Adrian

      Like

  2. This is a favorite. Reminds me of film or etchings. Having the figure in it transforms the whole narrative. I like the slight fisheye effect. Superb, Adrian! 🙂

    Like

  3. LensScaper says:

    The Fisheye intensifies the feeling of bleakness in this shot. A drab December day – well captured.

    Like

  4. krikitarts says:

    Shades of absolute other-worldliness, my friend. You just lead my eye (my old eye, that is–can’t focus closely enough with the new one yet) around and around. Especially like the unexpected highlight of the corrugated reinforcement and your tall, dark shadow. I’m rather glad you didn’t entitle this “Fish-man with a fat eye.”

    Like

    • Adrian Lewis says:

      Gary, my friend, how are you getting on? I note your reference to not being able to focus closely yet with one eye – a friend here had cataract operations recently and she had the same problem at first but she’s improving now. I hope you’re on the mend, but realise the 2nd operation is imminent. Take good care of yourself!

      Thanks for your kind thoughts about this shot. I’m pleased with it, and its success is in no small measure due to our mutual friend SEP2. >>> and I may be perfectly porcine but my eyes are slim …. 😉 … !!!!!

      Like

  5. Patti Kuche says:

    What a great sense of fluid direction and structure in this shot, not to mention wonderful creative use of the fish-eye!

    Like

  6. Very beautiful black and white photo. For me seems to be like a painting.

    Like

    • Adrian Lewis says:

      Thank you very much, Mirela. And especially for saying that it looks like a painting – if I can make my photos not look like photos – but to look like drawings or paintings – then I feel I’m getting somewhere! Adrian 🙂

      Like

  7. I like the way you worked with this, Adrian. Looks like a storm’s a–brewin’. 🙂
    I don’t think we’re in Kansas anymore, Toto.

    Like

  8. Meanderer says:

    Wonderful image, Adrian. I know how much you love this place – and to have you in it – and part of it – is brilliant. As you would say: ‘great stuff’ 🙂

    Like

  9. icastel says:

    I like this shot. It’s surreal … like a good dream should “look”. Good work, Adrian! 🙂

    Like

  10. Great use of the lens; you, spotting the world.

    Like

  11. Malin H says:

    Oh, Adrian! This is a fantastic image!! I can see you have returned and I still see the expressions in the trees… and this image is perfected with your shadow.

    A stunning image! A masterpiece! (I wouldn’t say it if I didn’t mean it).

    Like

  12. Wow! Superb photo – I borrowed a fisheye from a friend many years ago, and found it ‘strange’ – obviously not something you would want to use on a daily basis, but interesting nontheless.

    Like

    • Adrian Lewis says:

      Hi James, glad you like it, thanks! I quite agree about fisheyes – not something for frequent use, but useful now and again. This picture was taken with the fisheye pointed slightly downwards and hence the slight convexity of the horizon, but if I’d held the lens perfectly horizontal the horizon would have been horizontal and the effect would have been much more like a conventional wideangle. Adrian

      Like

  13. Dr_IQ says:

    Fish eye…nice.

    Like

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